PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.




PMID- 28379832
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171204
LR  - 20171204
IS  - 1558-7118 (Electronic)
IS  - 1557-2625 (Linking)
VI  - 30
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Mar-Apr
TI  - Comparison of Opioid Prescribing Patterns in the United States and Japan: Primary
      Care Physicians' Attitudes and Perceptions.
PG  - 248-254
LID - 10.3122/jabfm.2017.02.160299 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Far fewer opioids are prescribed in Japan than in the United
      States. METHODS: We conducted an online physician survey assessing attitudes and 
      perceptions that might influence prescribing. A Japanese version was distributed 
      to members of the Japan Primary Care Association and an English version to
      members of the American Academy of Family Physicians practicing in Oregon.
      RESULTS: We received 461 Japanese responses and 198 from the United States,
      though overall response rates were low (Japan: 10.1%, United States: 18.5%).
      Japanese respondents reported far less opioid prescribing than US respondents,
      especially for acute pain (acute pain: 49.4% vs 97.0%; chronic pain: 63.7% vs
      90.9%; P < .001 for both). Almost half of respondents from both countries
      indicated that patient expectations and satisfaction were important factors that 
      influence prescribing. US respondents were significantly more likely to identify 
      medical indication and legal expectation as reasons to prescribe opioids for
      acute pain. Most US respondents (95.4%) thought opioids were used too often,
      versus 6.6% of Japanese respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Lower opioid use was reported
      in Japan, especially for acute pain, which may help minimize long-term use.
      Patient expectations and satisfaction seem to influence opioid prescribing in
      both countries. The United States could learn from Japanese regulatory and
      cultural perspectives.
CI  - (c) Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.
FAU - Onishi, Eriko
AU  - Onishi E
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD). [email protected]
FAU - Kobayashi, Tadashi
AU  - Kobayashi T
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD).
FAU - Dexter, Eve
AU  - Dexter E
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD).
FAU - Marino, Miguel
AU  - Marino M
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD).
FAU - Maeno, Tetsuhiro
AU  - Maeno T
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD).
FAU - Deyo, Richard A
AU  - Deyo RA
AD  - From the Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,
      Portland (EO, ED, MM, RAD); the Department of General Medicine, Hirosaki
      University School of Medicine & Hospital, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
      (TK); the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (MM, RAD); the Department of Primary Care and
      Medical Education, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
      (TM); and the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Science, Oregon Health &
      Science University, Portland (RAD).
LA  - eng
PT  - Comparative Study
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Am Board Fam Med
JT  - Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM
JID - 101256526
RN  - 0 (Analgesics, Opioid)
SB  - IM
MH  - Acute Pain/drug therapy
MH  - Adult
MH  - Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MH  - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH  - Chronic Pain/drug therapy
MH  - Drug Overdose/epidemiology/prevention & control
MH  - Drug Prescriptions/standards/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Japan
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology/prevention & control
MH  - Pain Management/methods
MH  - Patient Satisfaction
MH  - Perception
MH  - Physicians, Family/*psychology
MH  - Physicians, Primary Care/*psychology
MH  - Practice Patterns, Physicians'/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - United States
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Acute Pain
OT  - Chronic Pain
OT  - Japan
OT  - Opioid Analgesics
OT  - Opioid-Related Disorders
OT  - Oregon
OT  - Prescriptions
OT  - Primary Health Care
OT  - Surveys and Questionnaires
EDAT- 2017/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/13 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - 30/2/248 [pii]
AID - 10.3122/jabfm.2017.02.160299 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Am Board Fam Med. 2017 Mar-Apr;30(2):248-254. doi:
      10.3122/jabfm.2017.02.160299.