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Management of orbital cellulitis and subperiosteal orbital abscess in pediatric patients: A ten-year review.

Abstract Pediatric periorbital cellulitis represents a common disease complicating a nasal infection.
PMID
Related Publications

Medical treatment of pediatric subperiosteal orbital abscess secondary to sinusitis.

Orbital complications of sinusitis.

Clinical analysis of computed tomography-staged orbital cellulitis in children.

Management of pediatric orbital cellulitis and abscess.

Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Orbital abscess

Orbital cellulitis

Postseptal cellulitis

Preseptal cellulitis

Sinusitis

Subperiosteal abscess

Journal Title international journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28390618
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170409
DCOM- 20170517
LR  - 20170517
IS  - 1872-8464 (Electronic)
IS  - 0165-5876 (Linking)
VI  - 96
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Management of orbital cellulitis and subperiosteal orbital abscess in pediatric
      patients: A ten-year review.
PG  - 72-76
LID - S0165-5876(17)30091-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.02.031 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Pediatric periorbital cellulitis represents a common disease
      complicating a nasal infection. METHODS: A ten-year retrospective review of
      fifty-seven children admitted to our institution with the diagnosis of
      periorbital cellulitis as a complication of sinus infections was carried out.
      RESULTS: The age varied from one month to eleven years (mean 3.9 years).
      Thirty-five were males (62%), while twenty-two were females (38%). Nine out of
      fifty-seven (15.8%) presented exophthalmos associated with eyelid erythema and
      edema, while the rest suffered mainly from eyelid erythema and edema. Twenty-two 
      patients complaining of exophthalmos or not responding to medical therapy within 
      48 h were assessed with a computed tomography scan (38.6%). A subperiosteal
      orbital abscess was detected in nine cases and these patients underwent surgical 
      drainage (15,8%). Recurrence of orbital infection occurred in three cases (5.3%).
      CONCLUSIONS: Medical management is the main treatment for both preseptal and
      postseptal orbital cellulitis. Nevertheless, there is no universally accepted
      guideline for the treatment of subperiosteal abscesses and each case should be
      treated accordingly. Urgent surgical drainage should be considered in cases not
      responding to adequate medical management, or those cases presenting visual
      deterioration.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Sciarretta, Vittorio
AU  - Sciarretta V
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Dematte, Marco
AU  - Dematte M
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Farneti, Paolo
AU  - Farneti P
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Fornaciari, Martina
AU  - Fornaciari M
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Corsini, Ilaria
AU  - Corsini I
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Piccin, Ottavio
AU  - Piccin O
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Saggese, Domenico
AU  - Saggese D
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Fernandez, Ignacio Javier
AU  - Fernandez IJ
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of
      Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170306
PL  - Ireland
TA  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol
JT  - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
JID - 8003603
RN  - 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
SB  - IM
MH  - Abscess/etiology/*surgery
MH  - Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Male
MH  - Orbital Cellulitis/etiology/*therapy
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Sinusitis/*complications
MH  - Tomography, X-Ray Computed
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Orbital abscess
OT  - Orbital cellulitis
OT  - Postseptal cellulitis
OT  - Preseptal cellulitis
OT  - Sinusitis
OT  - Subperiosteal abscess
EDAT- 2017/04/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/10 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/29 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/23 [revised]
PHST- 2017/02/25 [accepted]
AID - S0165-5876(17)30091-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.02.031 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 May;96:72-76. doi:
      10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.02.031. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

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