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Theory of mind and language development in Japanese children with hearing loss.

Abstract This study investigates the development of theory of mind (ToM) in Japanese children with hearing loss (HL) and its relationship with language abilities using the data of a large sample size.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Children with hearing loss

Language development

Theory of mind

Journal Title international journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28390619
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170409
LR  - 20170409
IS  - 1872-8464 (Electronic)
IS  - 0165-5876 (Linking)
VI  - 96
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Theory of mind and language development in Japanese children with hearing loss.
PG  - 77-83
LID - S0165-5876(17)30096-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.03.005 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the development of theory of mind (ToM) in
      Japanese children with hearing loss (HL) and its relationship with language
      abilities using the data of a large sample size. METHODS: Participants were 369
      children with HL, ranging from 4 to 12 years of age. The mean hearing level of
      the better ear was 100.7 dB. A "change in location"-type false belief task
      similar to the "Sally-Anne test" was given to the participants. RESULTS: The pass
      rates for the false belief task were in the 20% range for 4 to 6-year-olds, 35.6%
      for 7-year-olds, 47.6% for 8-year-olds, and 63.6% for 9-year-olds. However, no
      children, even 12-year-olds, achieved a pass rate of 70%. A logistic regression
      analysis showed that the significant independent predictors of the false belief
      task performance were vocabulary age and syntactic comprehension level, and
      chronological age, hearing level, syntactic production level, and nonverbal
      intelligence were excluded. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that there is a
      delay in the development of ToM in Japanese children with HL. This finding is
      consistent with findings in English-speaking countries. Additionally, it is
      suggested that language abilities play an important role in the acquisition of
      ToM for children with HL.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Fujino, Hiroshi
AU  - Fujino H
AD  - Department of Special Needs Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo, Japan.
      Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Fukushima, Kunihiro
AU  - Fukushima K
AD  - Shinkurashiki Ear, Nose, and Throat Clinic, Japan; Department of Otolaryngology, 
      Fukuoka University, Japan.
FAU - Fujiyoshi, Akie
AU  - Fujiyoshi A
AD  - Shinkurashiki Ear, Nose, and Throat Clinic, Japan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170306
PL  - Ireland
TA  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol
JT  - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
JID - 8003603
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Children with hearing loss
OT  - Language development
OT  - Theory of mind
EDAT- 2017/04/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/10 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/01 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/27 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/01 [accepted]
AID - S0165-5876(17)30096-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.03.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 May;96:77-83. doi:
      10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.03.005. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

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