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Bacterial Osteomyelitis or Nonbacterial Osteitis in Children: A Study Involving the German Surveillance Unit for Rare Diseases in Childhood.

Abstract Although bacterial osteomyelitis (BO) is a commonly recognized diagnosis in pediatrics, it is often difficult to distinguish from nonbacterial osteitis (NBO). The goal of our study was to distinguish between the 2 disease entities and better define NBO.
PMID
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Bacterial Osteomyelitis or Nonbacterial Osteitis in Children: A Study Involving the German Surveillance Unit for Rare Diseases in Childhood.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Public Health Surveillance

Keywords
Journal Title the pediatric infectious disease journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28403046
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170413
DCOM- 20170420
LR  - 20170420
IS  - 1532-0987 (Electronic)
IS  - 0891-3668 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 5
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Bacterial Osteomyelitis or Nonbacterial Osteitis in Children: A Study Involving
      the German Surveillance Unit for Rare Diseases in Childhood.
PG  - 451-456
LID - 10.1097/INF.0000000000001469 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Although bacterial osteomyelitis (BO) is a commonly recognized
      diagnosis in pediatrics, it is often difficult to distinguish from nonbacterial
      osteitis (NBO). The goal of our study was to distinguish between the 2 disease
      entities and better define NBO. METHODS: Using the German Surveillance Unit for
      Rare Diseases in Childhood (Erhebungseinheit fur Seltene Paediatrische
      Erkrankungen in Deutschland), this prospective study during a 5-year period
      captured 657 patients at first diagnosis of either BO (n = 378) or NBO (n = 279) 
      while analyzing epidemiologic, clinical and radiologic data. RESULTS: BO was
      reported in 1.2 per 100,000 children with a higher prevalence in younger male
      patients (58%), and NBO was reported in 0.45 per 100,000 children. BO patients
      tended to present with fevers (68%), elevated inflammation markers (82%) and
      local swelling (62%) but a shorter course of symptoms than NBO patients. NBO
      patients presented in good general health (86%) and were more likely to have
      multifocal lesions (66%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prominent pathogen
      (83%), with only one methicillin-resistant S. aureus reported. Complications
      ranged from arthritis adjacent to the lesion to hyperostosis and vertebral
      fractures. CONCLUSIONS: BO and NBO can be distinguished based on symptoms,
      associated diseases and inflammation markers. NBO should always be considered in 
      pediatric patients presenting with bone lesions and pain, especially in young
      female patients presenting with good general health, minimal inflammation markers
      and multifocal lesions in the vertebrae, clavicle and sternum.
FAU - Grote, Veit
AU  - Grote V
AD  - From the Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Dr. von Hauner Children's
      Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Silier, Colen C G
AU  - Silier CC
FAU - Voit, Agnes M
AU  - Voit AM
FAU - Jansson, Annette F
AU  - Jansson AF
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Multicenter Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Pediatr Infect Dis J
JT  - The Pediatric infectious disease journal
JID - 8701858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Diagnosis, Differential
MH  - Female
MH  - Fractures, Bone/diagnosis/epidemiology/etiology/pathology
MH  - Germany/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hyperostosis/diagnosis/epidemiology/etiology/pathology
MH  - Infant
MH  - Male
MH  - Osteitis/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology
MH  - Osteomyelitis/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology
MH  - Prospective Studies
MH  - *Public Health Surveillance
MH  - Rare Diseases/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology
MH  - Spine/pathology
MH  - Staphylococcal Infections/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology
MH  - Staphylococcus aureus/growth & development/isolation & purification
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
AID - 10.1097/INF.0000000000001469 [doi]
AID - 00006454-201705000-00003 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 May;36(5):451-456. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000001469.

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