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Advances in Vector Control Science: Rear-and-Release Strategies Show Promiseā€¦ but Don't Forget the Basics.

Abstract Both chikungunya and Zika viruses have recently swept from Africa across the Pacific to the Americas, causing major outbreaks of disease in humans. In the meantime, dengue epidemics continue throughout the tropics. Traditional vector control programs based on strategies from 1950s and 1960s have been relatively ineffective in combating recent epidemics. In response, new methods involving the rearing and releasing of large numbers of mosquitoes to eliminate or modify local Aedes populations are being developed, with several currently conducting field releases in high-risk countries. These advances, include the release of Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, for either its virus-blocking capabilities, sterilization by cytoplasmic incompatibility, or both; the release of Aedes carrying dominant lethal genes, such as the OX513A strain of A. aegypti; and other emerging techniques, such as advancing gene-drive technologies, are summarized, as well as current stages of development and primary operational and regulatory hurdles. Although these technologies show great promise, none are ready for widespread rollout for cities of millions of people. Thus, efforts should be made to avoid methods such as space sprays that have failed and improve existing technologies to increase their efficacy.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Aedes aegypti

SIT

Wolbachia

gene drive.

vector control

Journal Title the journal of infectious diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28403439
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170413
LR  - 20170413
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 215
IP  - suppl_2
DP  - 2017 Mar 01
TI  - Advances in Vector Control Science: Rear-and-Release Strategies Show Promise...
      but Don't Forget the Basics.
PG  - S103-S108
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jiw575 [doi]
AB  - Both chikungunya and Zika viruses have recently swept from Africa across the
      Pacific to the Americas, causing major outbreaks of disease in humans. In the
      meantime, dengue epidemics continue throughout the tropics. Traditional vector
      control programs based on strategies from 1950s and 1960s have been relatively
      ineffective in combating recent epidemics. In response, new methods involving the
      rearing and releasing of large numbers of mosquitoes to eliminate or modify local
      Aedes populations are being developed, with several currently conducting field
      releases in high-risk countries. These advances, include the release of
      Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, for either its
      virus-blocking capabilities, sterilization by cytoplasmic incompatibility, or
      both; the release of Aedes carrying dominant lethal genes, such as the OX513A
      strain of A. aegypti; and other emerging techniques, such as advancing gene-drive
      technologies, are summarized, as well as current stages of development and
      primary operational and regulatory hurdles. Although these technologies show
      great promise, none are ready for widespread rollout for cities of millions of
      people. Thus, efforts should be made to avoid methods such as space sprays that
      have failed and improve existing technologies to increase their efficacy.
CI  - (c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious
      Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail:
      [email protected]
FAU - Ritchie, Scott A
AU  - Ritchie SA
AD  - College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences and.
AD  - Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University,
      Cairns, Queensland Australia.
FAU - Johnson, Brian J
AU  - Johnson BJ
AD  - College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences and.
AD  - Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University,
      Cairns, Queensland Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Aedes aegypti
OT  - SIT
OT  - Wolbachia
OT  - gene drive.
OT  - vector control
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
AID - 3574516 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jiw575 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Mar 1;215(suppl_2):S103-S108. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiw575.

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