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Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection.

Abstract Infection with any of the 4 dengue virus serotypes results in a diverse range of symptoms, from mild undifferentiated fever to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever and shock. Given that dengue virus infection elicits such a broad range of clinical symptoms, early and accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential for appropriate patient management. Virus detection and serological conversion have been the main targets of diagnostic assessment for many years, however cross-reactivity of antibody responses among the flaviviruses has been a confounding issue in providing a differential diagnosis. Furthermore, there is no single, definitive diagnostic biomarker that is present across the entire period of patient presentation, particularly in those experiencing a secondary dengue infection. Nevertheless, the development and commercialization of point-of-care combination tests capable of detecting markers of infection present during different stages of infection (viral nonstructural protein 1 and immunoglobulin M) has greatly simplified laboratory-based dengue diagnosis. Despite these advances, significant challenges remain in the clinical management of dengue-infected patients, especially in the absence of reliable biomarkers that provide an effective prognostic indicator of severe disease progression. This review briefly summarizes some of the complexities and issues surrounding clinical dengue diagnosis and the laboratory diagnostic options currently available.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

NS1 antigen capture

dengue diagnosis

dengue disease

dengue serology.

dengue virus

Journal Title the journal of infectious diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28403441
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170413
DCOM- 20170420
LR  - 20170420
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 215
IP  - suppl_2
DP  - 2017 Mar 01
TI  - Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection.
PG  - S89-S95
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jiw649 [doi]
AB  - Infection with any of the 4 dengue virus serotypes results in a diverse range of 
      symptoms, from mild undifferentiated fever to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever 
      and shock. Given that dengue virus infection elicits such a broad range of
      clinical symptoms, early and accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential for
      appropriate patient management. Virus detection and serological conversion have
      been the main targets of diagnostic assessment for many years, however
      cross-reactivity of antibody responses among the flaviviruses has been a
      confounding issue in providing a differential diagnosis. Furthermore, there is no
      single, definitive diagnostic biomarker that is present across the entire period 
      of patient presentation, particularly in those experiencing a secondary dengue
      infection. Nevertheless, the development and commercialization of point-of-care
      combination tests capable of detecting markers of infection present during
      different stages of infection (viral nonstructural protein 1 and immunoglobulin
      M) has greatly simplified laboratory-based dengue diagnosis. Despite these
      advances, significant challenges remain in the clinical management of
      dengue-infected patients, especially in the absence of reliable biomarkers that
      provide an effective prognostic indicator of severe disease progression. This
      review briefly summarizes some of the complexities and issues surrounding
      clinical dengue diagnosis and the laboratory diagnostic options currently
      available.
CI  - (c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious
      Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail:
      [email protected]
FAU - Muller, David A
AU  - Muller DA
AD  - Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and.
AD  - Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, School of Chemistry and Molecular
      Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
FAU - Depelsenaire, Alexandra C I
AU  - Depelsenaire AC
AD  - Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and.
FAU - Young, Paul R
AU  - Young PR
AD  - Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, School of Chemistry and Molecular
      Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane,Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Dengue/*diagnosis/virology
MH  - Dengue Virus/genetics/immunology/isolation & purification
MH  - Early Diagnosis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - *NS1 antigen capture
OT  - *dengue diagnosis
OT  - *dengue disease
OT  - *dengue serology.
OT  - *dengue virus
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
AID - 3574518 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jiw649 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Mar 1;215(suppl_2):S89-S95. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiw649.

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