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The Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases and Refugee Health Network of Australia recommendations for health assessment for people from refugee-like backgrounds: an abridged outline.

Abstract In 2009, the Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases published guidelines on the post-arrival health assessment of recently arrived refugees. Since then, the number of refugees and asylum seekers reaching Australia has increased substantially (17 555 refugees in 2015-16) and the countries of origin have changed. These groups are likely to have had poor access to health care pre-arrival and, consequently, are at risk of a range of chronic and infectious diseases. We established an advisory group that included infectious diseases physicians, general practitioners, public health specialists, paediatricians and refugee health nurses to update the 2009 guidelines.Main recommendations: All people from refugee-like backgrounds, including children, should be offered a tailored comprehensive health assessment and management plan, ideally within 1 month of arrival in Australia. This can be offered at any time if initial contact with a GP or clinic is delayed. Recommended screening depends on history, examination and previous investigations, and is tailored based on age, gender, countries of origin and transit and risk profile. The full version of the guidelines is available at http://www.asid.net.au/documents/item/1225.Changes in management as a result of this guideline: These guidelines apply to all people from refugee-like backgrounds, including asylum seekers. They provide more information about non-communicable diseases and consider Asia and the Middle East as regions of origin as well as Africa. Key changes include an emphasis on person-centred care; risk-based rather than universal screening for hepatitis C virus, malaria, schistosomiasis and sexually transmissible infections; updated immunisation guidelines; and new recommendations for other problems, such as nutritional deficiencies, women's health and mental health.
PMID
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The Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases guidelines for the diagnosis, management and prevention of infections in recently arrived refugees: an abridged outline.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the medical journal of australia
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28403765
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170413
DCOM- 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 1326-5377 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-729X (Linking)
VI  - 206
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Apr 17
TI  - The Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases and Refugee Health Network of
      Australia recommendations for health assessment for people from refugee-like
      backgrounds: an abridged outline.
PG  - 310-315
AB  - INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases published 
      guidelines on the post-arrival health assessment of recently arrived refugees.
      Since then, the number of refugees and asylum seekers reaching Australia has
      increased substantially (17 555 refugees in 2015-16) and the countries of origin 
      have changed. These groups are likely to have had poor access to health care
      pre-arrival and, consequently, are at risk of a range of chronic and infectious
      diseases. We established an advisory group that included infectious diseases
      physicians, general practitioners, public health specialists, paediatricians and 
      refugee health nurses to update the 2009 guidelines.Main recommendations: All
      people from refugee-like backgrounds, including children, should be offered a
      tailored comprehensive health assessment and management plan, ideally within 1
      month of arrival in Australia. This can be offered at any time if initial contact
      with a GP or clinic is delayed. Recommended screening depends on history,
      examination and previous investigations, and is tailored based on age, gender,
      countries of origin and transit and risk profile. The full version of the
      guidelines is available at http://www.asid.net.au/documents/item/1225.Changes in 
      management as a result of this guideline: These guidelines apply to all people
      from refugee-like backgrounds, including asylum seekers. They provide more
      information about non-communicable diseases and consider Asia and the Middle East
      as regions of origin as well as Africa. Key changes include an emphasis on
      person-centred care; risk-based rather than universal screening for hepatitis C
      virus, malaria, schistosomiasis and sexually transmissible infections; updated
      immunisation guidelines; and new recommendations for other problems, such as
      nutritional deficiencies, women's health and mental health.
FAU - Chaves, Nadia J
AU  - Chaves NJ
AD  - Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC [email protected]
FAU - Paxton, Georgia A
AU  - Paxton GA
AD  - Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Biggs, Beverley-Ann
AU  - Biggs BA
AD  - University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Thambiran, Aesen
AU  - Thambiran A
AD  - Humanitarian Entrant Health Service, Department of Health Western Australia,
      Perth, WA.
FAU - Gardiner, Joanne
AU  - Gardiner J
AD  - Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Williams, Jan
AU  - Williams J
AD  - Migrant Health Service, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA.
FAU - Smith, Mitchell M
AU  - Smith MM
AD  - New South Wales Refugee Health Service, Sydney, NSW.
FAU - Davis, Joshua S
AU  - Davis JS
AD  - Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, NT.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Practice Guideline
PL  - Australia
TA  - Med J Aust
JT  - The Medical journal of Australia
JID - 0400714
SB  - IM
MH  - African Continental Ancestry Group
MH  - Asian Continental Ancestry Group
MH  - Australia
MH  - Communicable Diseases/*classification/*diagnosis/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Mass Screening/*standards
MH  - Public Health/*standards
MH  - Refugees/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Societies, Medical
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/12 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/15 [accepted]
AID - 10.5694/mja16.00826 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Med J Aust. 2017 Apr 17;206(7):310-315.

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