PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Tick-borne infectious diseases in Australia.

Abstract Tick bites in Australia can lead to a variety of illnesses in patients. These include infection, allergies, paralysis, autoimmune disease, post-infection fatigue and Australian multisystem disorder. Rickettsial (Rickettsia spp.) infections (Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever and Australian spotted fever) and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) are the only systemic bacterial infections that are known to be transmitted by tick bites in Australia. Three species of local ticks transmit bacterial infection following a tick bite: the paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is endemic on the east coast of Australia and causes Queensland tick typhus due to R. australis and Q fever due to C. burnetii; the ornate kangaroo tick (Amblyomma triguttatum) occurs throughout much of northern, central and western Australia and causes Q fever; and the southern reptile tick (Bothriocroton hydrosauri) is found mainly in south-eastern Australia and causes Flinders Island spotted fever due to R. honei. Much about Australian ticks and the medical outcomes following tick bites remains unknown. Further research is required to increase understanding of these areas.
PMID
Related Publications

Rickettsioses in Australia.

Flinders Island spotted fever rickettsioses caused by "marmionii" strain of Rickettsia honei, Eastern Australia.

Rickettsioses in Australia.

Aponomma hydrosauri, the reptile-associated tick reservoir of Rickettsia honei on Flinders Island, Australia.

Rickettsia Detected in the Reptile Tick Bothriocroton hydrosauri from the Lizard Tiliqua rugosa in South Australia.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the medical journal of australia
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28403767
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170413
DCOM- 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 1326-5377 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-729X (Linking)
VI  - 206
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Apr 17
TI  - Tick-borne infectious diseases in Australia.
PG  - 320-324
AB  - Tick bites in Australia can lead to a variety of illnesses in patients. These
      include infection, allergies, paralysis, autoimmune disease, post-infection
      fatigue and Australian multisystem disorder. Rickettsial (Rickettsia spp.)
      infections (Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever and Australian 
      spotted fever) and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) are the only systemic bacterial
      infections that are known to be transmitted by tick bites in Australia. Three
      species of local ticks transmit bacterial infection following a tick bite: the
      paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is endemic on the east coast of Australia and 
      causes Queensland tick typhus due to R. australis and Q fever due to C. burnetii;
      the ornate kangaroo tick (Amblyomma triguttatum) occurs throughout much of
      northern, central and western Australia and causes Q fever; and the southern
      reptile tick (Bothriocroton hydrosauri) is found mainly in south-eastern
      Australia and causes Flinders Island spotted fever due to R. honei. Much about
      Australian ticks and the medical outcomes following tick bites remains unknown.
      Further research is required to increase understanding of these areas.
FAU - Graves, Stephen R
AU  - Graves SR
AD  - Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, Geelong, VIC
      [email protected]
FAU - Stenos, John
AU  - Stenos J
AD  - Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, Geelong, VIC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - Australia
TA  - Med J Aust
JT  - The Medical journal of Australia
JID - 0400714
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Australia/epidemiology
MH  - Autoimmunity
MH  - Fatigue
MH  - Humans
MH  - Paralysis/etiology
MH  - Q Fever/*epidemiology
MH  - Rickettsia/classification
MH  - Rickettsia Infections/*epidemiology
MH  - Tick-Borne Diseases/*epidemiology/microbiology/virology
MH  - Ticks/*classification
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/30 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/20 [accepted]
AID - 10.5694/mja17.00090 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Med J Aust. 2017 Apr 17;206(7):320-324.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
</b:Sources>