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Peritonsillar Abscess.

Abstract Peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep infection of the head and neck, occurring primarily in young adults. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of clinical presentation and examination. Symptoms and findings generally include fever, sore throat, dysphagia, trismus, and a "hot potato" voice. Drainage of the abscess, antibiotic therapy, and supportive therapy for maintaining hydration and pain control are the cornerstones of treatment. Most patients can be managed in the outpatient setting. Peritonsillar abscesses are polymicrobial infections, and antibiotics effective against group A streptococcus and oral anaerobes should be first-line therapy. Corticosteroids may be helpful in reducing symptoms and speeding recovery. Promptly recognizing the infection and initiating therapy are important to avoid potentially serious complications, such as airway obstruction, aspiration, or extension of infection into deep neck tissues. Patients with peritonsillar abscess are usually first encountered in the primary care outpatient setting or in the emergency department. Family physicians with appropriate training and experience can diagnose and treat most patients with peritonsillar abscess.
PMID
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Peritonsillar abscess.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Drainage

Keywords
Journal Title american family physician
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28409615
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170414
DCOM- 20170425
LR  - 20170425
IS  - 1532-0650 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-838X (Linking)
VI  - 95
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Apr 15
TI  - Peritonsillar Abscess.
PG  - 501-506
AB  - Peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep infection of the head and neck,
      occurring primarily in young adults. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of
      clinical presentation and examination. Symptoms and findings generally include
      fever, sore throat, dysphagia, trismus, and a "hot potato" voice. Drainage of the
      abscess, antibiotic therapy, and supportive therapy for maintaining hydration and
      pain control are the cornerstones of treatment. Most patients can be managed in
      the outpatient setting. Peritonsillar abscesses are polymicrobial infections, and
      antibiotics effective against group A streptococcus and oral anaerobes should be 
      first-line therapy. Corticosteroids may be helpful in reducing symptoms and
      speeding recovery. Promptly recognizing the infection and initiating therapy are 
      important to avoid potentially serious complications, such as airway obstruction,
      aspiration, or extension of infection into deep neck tissues. Patients with
      peritonsillar abscess are usually first encountered in the primary care
      outpatient setting or in the emergency department. Family physicians with
      appropriate training and experience can diagnose and treat most patients with
      peritonsillar abscess.
FAU - Galioto, Nicholas J
AU  - Galioto NJ
AD  - Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am Fam Physician
JT  - American family physician
JID - 1272646
RN  - 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
RN  - 0 (Glucocorticoids)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Age Factors
MH  - Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - *Drainage/methods
MH  - Glucocorticoids/*therapeutic use
MH  - Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Humans
MH  - Peritonsillar Abscess/*diagnosis/microbiology/*therapy
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Streptococcus pyogenes/isolation & purification
MH  - Treatment Outcome
EDAT- 2017/04/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/15 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/15 06:00
AID - d12970 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am Fam Physician. 2017 Apr 15;95(8):501-506.

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