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Cilia and sensory signaling: The journey from "animalcules" to human disease.

Abstract Nearly all cell types in mammals contain cilia, small rod-like or more elaborate structures that extend from the cell surface. Cilia house signaling proteins that allow the cell to sample their environment and respond appropriately. Mutations in ciliary genes alter the functions of a broad range of cell and tissue types, including sensory and central neurons, and underlie a collection of heterogeneous human disorders called ciliopathies. Here, I highlight the critical contributions of nearly three centuries of research in diverse organisms to our current knowledge of cilia function in sensory signaling and human disease.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos biology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28410391
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170414
DCOM- 20170425
LR  - 20170425
IS  - 1545-7885 (Electronic)
IS  - 1544-9173 (Linking)
VI  - 15
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017 Apr
TI  - Cilia and sensory signaling: The journey from "animalcules" to human disease.
PG  - e2002240
LID - 10.1371/journal.pbio.2002240 [doi]
AB  - Nearly all cell types in mammals contain cilia, small rod-like or more elaborate 
      structures that extend from the cell surface. Cilia house signaling proteins that
      allow the cell to sample their environment and respond appropriately. Mutations
      in ciliary genes alter the functions of a broad range of cell and tissue types,
      including sensory and central neurons, and underlie a collection of heterogeneous
      human disorders called ciliopathies. Here, I highlight the critical contributions
      of nearly three centuries of research in diverse organisms to our current
      knowledge of cilia function in sensory signaling and human disease.
FAU - Sengupta, Piali
AU  - Sengupta P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7468-0035
AD  - Department of Biology and National Center for Behavioral Genomics, Brandeis
      University, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170414
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Biol
JT  - PLoS biology
JID - 101183755
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Caenorhabditis elegans/cytology/physiology
MH  - Chlamydomonas/metabolism
MH  - Cilia/*physiology
MH  - Ciliopathies/*etiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Mice
MH  - Signal Transduction
EDAT- 2017/04/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/26 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/15 06:00
AID - 10.1371/journal.pbio.2002240 [doi]
AID - pbio.2002240 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Biol. 2017 Apr 14;15(4):e2002240. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2002240.
      eCollection 2017 Apr.

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