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Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

Abstract The oldest-old represent the fastest growing segment of society, and the risk of developing dementia continues to increase with advancing age into the 9th and 10th decades of life. The most common form of dementia in the oldest-old is Alzheimer disease (AD), although there are often mixed pathologies contributing to dementia in addition to amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Diagnosing AD in the oldest-old is challenging due to cognitive and physical changes associated with aging. Treatment remains supportive, with current approved medications able to provide modest symptomatic benefit but unable to slow the progression of disease.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Aging

Keywords

Alzheimer disease

Dementia

Late-onset

Oldest-old

Pathology

Journal Title neurologic clinics
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28410660
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170415
DCOM- 20170420
LR  - 20170420
IS  - 1557-9875 (Electronic)
IS  - 0733-8619 (Linking)
VI  - 35
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease.
PG  - 283-293
LID - S0733-8619(17)30006-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.006 [doi]
AB  - The oldest-old represent the fastest growing segment of society, and the risk of 
      developing dementia continues to increase with advancing age into the 9th and
      10th decades of life. The most common form of dementia in the oldest-old is
      Alzheimer disease (AD), although there are often mixed pathologies contributing
      to dementia in addition to amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles.
      Diagnosing AD in the oldest-old is challenging due to cognitive and physical
      changes associated with aging. Treatment remains supportive, with current
      approved medications able to provide modest symptomatic benefit but unable to
      slow the progression of disease.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Pierce, Aimee L
AU  - Pierce AL
AD  - Department of Neurology and Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological
      Disorders, University of California, Irvine, 1100 Medical Plaza Drive, Irvine, CA
      92697, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Bullain, Szofia S
AU  - Bullain SS
AD  - Department of Neurology and Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological
      Disorders, University of California, Irvine, 1515 Hewitt Hall, Irvine, CA 92697, 
      USA.
FAU - Kawas, Claudia H
AU  - Kawas CH
AD  - Departments of Neurology, Neurobiology & Behavior, Epidemiology, and Institute
      for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California,
      Irvine, 1121 Gillespie, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Neurol Clin
JT  - Neurologic clinics
JID - 8219232
SB  - IM
MH  - Age of Onset
MH  - *Aging
MH  - Alzheimer Disease/*pathology/*physiopathology
MH  - Dementia/pathology/*physiopathology
MH  - Humans
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Alzheimer disease
OT  - Dementia
OT  - Late-onset
OT  - Oldest-old
OT  - Pathology
EDAT- 2017/04/16 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/16 06:00
AID - S0733-8619(17)30006-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Neurol Clin. 2017 May;35(2):283-293. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.006.

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