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Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment in Late Life.

Abstract Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the second leading cause of cognitive impairment in late life. Structural neuroimaging offers the most sensitive and specific biomarkers for hemorrhages and infarcts, but there are significant limitations in its ability to detect microvascular disease, microinfarcts, dynamic changes in the blood-brain barrier, and preclinical cerebrovascular disease. Autopsy studies disclose the common co-occurrence of vascular and neurodegenerative conditions, suggesting that in late life, a multifactorial approach to cognitive impairment may be more appropriate than traditional dichotomous classifications. Management of vascular risk factors remains a proven and practical approach to reducing acute and progressive cognitive impairment and dementia.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Diagnosis

MRI

Neuropathology

Silent brain infarct

Treatment

Vascular cognitive impairment

Vascular dementia

White matter hyperintensity

Journal Title neurologic clinics
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28410661
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170415
LR  - 20170415
IS  - 1557-9875 (Electronic)
IS  - 0733-8619 (Linking)
VI  - 35
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment in Late Life.
PG  - 295-323
LID - S0733-8619(17)30007-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.007 [doi]
AB  - Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the second leading cause of cognitive impairment
      in late life. Structural neuroimaging offers the most sensitive and specific
      biomarkers for hemorrhages and infarcts, but there are significant limitations in
      its ability to detect microvascular disease, microinfarcts, dynamic changes in
      the blood-brain barrier, and preclinical cerebrovascular disease. Autopsy studies
      disclose the common co-occurrence of vascular and neurodegenerative conditions,
      suggesting that in late life, a multifactorial approach to cognitive impairment
      may be more appropriate than traditional dichotomous classifications. Management 
      of vascular risk factors remains a proven and practical approach to reducing
      acute and progressive cognitive impairment and dementia.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Chui, Helena C
AU  - Chui HC
AD  - Department of Neurology, University of Southern California, 1540 Alcazar Street, 
      CHP215, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Ramirez Gomez, Liliana
AU  - Ramirez Gomez L
AD  - Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, 400 Parnassus
      Avenue, A871, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Neurol Clin
JT  - Neurologic clinics
JID - 8219232
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Diagnosis
OT  - MRI
OT  - Neuropathology
OT  - Silent brain infarct
OT  - Treatment
OT  - Vascular cognitive impairment
OT  - Vascular dementia
OT  - White matter hyperintensity
EDAT- 2017/04/16 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/16 06:00
AID - S0733-8619(17)30007-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Neurol Clin. 2017 May;35(2):295-323. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.01.007.

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