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North American Snake Envenomation.

Abstract Native US snakes that produce clinically significant envenomation can be divided into 2 groups, crotalids and elapids. The crotalids include rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and copperheads. Crotalid envenomation can result in significant local tissue damage as well as thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Rarely are bites fatal. Native US elapids are all coral snakes that possess neurotoxic venom that can cause weakness, respiratory paralysis, and rarely death. Treatment of both types of envenomation revolves around general supportive care and antivenom administration when indicated. Previously advocated treatments, such as tourniquets, venom extraction, and bite site excision are not recommended.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Viperidae

Keywords

Copperhead

Coral snake

Cottonmouth

Crotalid

Elapid

Rattlesnake

Journal Title emergency medicine clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28411931
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170416
DCOM- 20170421
LR  - 20170421
IS  - 1558-0539 (Electronic)
IS  - 0733-8627 (Linking)
VI  - 35
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - North American Snake Envenomation.
PG  - 339-354
LID - S0733-8627(16)30117-1 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.emc.2016.12.003 [doi]
AB  - Native US snakes that produce clinically significant envenomation can be divided 
      into 2 groups, crotalids and elapids. The crotalids include rattlesnakes,
      cottonmouths, and copperheads. Crotalid envenomation can result in significant
      local tissue damage as well as thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Rarely are
      bites fatal. Native US elapids are all coral snakes that possess neurotoxic venom
      that can cause weakness, respiratory paralysis, and rarely death. Treatment of
      both types of envenomation revolves around general supportive care and antivenom 
      administration when indicated. Previously advocated treatments, such as
      tourniquets, venom extraction, and bite site excision are not recommended.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Corbett, Bryan
AU  - Corbett B
AD  - Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego
      Health, 200 West Arbor Drive # 8676, San Diego, CA 92103, USA. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Clark, Richard F
AU  - Clark RF
AD  - Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego
      Health, 200 West Arbor Drive # 8676, San Diego, CA 92103, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Emerg Med Clin North Am
JT  - Emergency medicine clinics of North America
JID - 8219565
RN  - 0 (Antivenins)
RN  - 0 (Snake Venoms)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Antivenins/*therapeutic use
MH  - Hematologic Diseases/etiology/therapy
MH  - Humans
MH  - Snake Bites/complications/*therapy
MH  - Snake Venoms/*poisoning
MH  - *Viperidae
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Copperhead
OT  - Coral snake
OT  - Cottonmouth
OT  - Crotalid
OT  - Elapid
OT  - Rattlesnake
EDAT- 2017/04/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/17 06:00
AID - S0733-8627(16)30117-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.emc.2016.12.003 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2017 May;35(2):339-354. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2016.12.003.

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