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Arthropod Envenomation in North America.

Abstract Arthropods (phylum Arthopoda) account for a higher percentage of morbidity and mortality to humans than do mammalian bites, snake bites, or marine envenomation. They are ubiquitous in domestic dwellings, caves, and campsites and in wilderness settings such as deserts, forests, and lakes. Although arthropods are most intrusive during warmer months, many are active throughout the winter, particularly indoors. Arthropods are also nocturnal and often bite unsuspecting victims while they are sleeping. Encounters with humans are generally defensive, accidental, or reactive. An individual stung by an insect or bitten by an arachnid may experience pain and local swelling, an anaphylactic reaction, or life-threatening toxicity. This review discusses the clinical presentation and latest treatment recommendations for bites and stings from spiders, scorpions, bees, ants, ticks and centipedes of North America.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Arthropods

Keywords

Ants

Arthropods

Bees

Centipedes

Hymenoptera

Scorpions

Spiders

Ticks

Journal Title emergency medicine clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28411932
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170416
DCOM- 20170421
LR  - 20170421
IS  - 1558-0539 (Electronic)
IS  - 0733-8627 (Linking)
VI  - 35
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Arthropod Envenomation in North America.
PG  - 355-375
LID - S0733-8627(17)30001-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.emc.2017.01.001 [doi]
AB  - Arthropods (phylum Arthopoda) account for a higher percentage of morbidity and
      mortality to humans than do mammalian bites, snake bites, or marine envenomation.
      They are ubiquitous in domestic dwellings, caves, and campsites and in wilderness
      settings such as deserts, forests, and lakes. Although arthropods are most
      intrusive during warmer months, many are active throughout the winter,
      particularly indoors. Arthropods are also nocturnal and often bite unsuspecting
      victims while they are sleeping. Encounters with humans are generally defensive, 
      accidental, or reactive. An individual stung by an insect or bitten by an
      arachnid may experience pain and local swelling, an anaphylactic reaction, or
      life-threatening toxicity. This review discusses the clinical presentation and
      latest treatment recommendations for bites and stings from spiders, scorpions,
      bees, ants, ticks and centipedes of North America.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Erickson, Timothy B
AU  - Erickson TB
AD  - Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and
      Women's Hospital, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative & Harvard Medical School,
      Neville House, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Cheema, Navneet
AU  - Cheema N
AD  - Section of Emergency Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Emerg Med Clin North Am
JT  - Emergency medicine clinics of North America
JID - 8219565
RN  - 0 (Antivenins)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Antivenins/therapeutic use
MH  - *Arthropods
MH  - Bites and Stings/etiology/*therapy
MH  - Combined Modality Therapy
MH  - Humans
MH  - North America
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Ants
OT  - Arthropods
OT  - Bees
OT  - Centipedes
OT  - Hymenoptera
OT  - Scorpions
OT  - Spiders
OT  - Ticks
EDAT- 2017/04/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/17 06:00
AID - S0733-8627(17)30001-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.emc.2017.01.001 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2017 May;35(2):355-375. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2017.01.001.

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