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Prospects for malaria control through manipulation of mosquito larval habitats and olfactory-mediated behavioural responses using plant-derived compounds.

Abstract Malaria presents an overwhelming public health challenge, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where vector favourable conditions and poverty prevail, potentiating the disease burden. Behavioural variability of malaria vectors poses a great challenge to existing vector control programmes with insecticide resistance already acquired to nearly all available chemical compounds. Thus, approaches incorporating plant-derived compounds to manipulate semiochemical-mediated behaviours through disruption of mosquito olfactory sensory system have considerably gained interests to interrupt malaria transmission cycle. The combination of push-pull methods and larval control have the potential to reduce malaria vector populations, thus minimising the risk of contracting malaria especially in resource-constrained communities where access to synthetic insecticides is a challenge. In this review, we have compiled information regarding the current status of knowledge on manipulation of larval ecology and chemical-mediated behaviour of adult mosquitoes with plant-derived compounds for controlling mosquito populations. Further, an update on the current advancements in technologies to improve longevity and efficiency of these compounds for field applications has been provided.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Anopheline mosquitoes

Integrated vector management

Larval habitat manipulation

Malaria

Mosquito functional ecology

Plant-derived compounds

Vector control

Journal Title parasites & vectors
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28412962
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170417
DCOM- 20170425
LR  - 20170425
IS  - 1756-3305 (Electronic)
IS  - 1756-3305 (Linking)
VI  - 10
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Apr 17
TI  - Prospects for malaria control through manipulation of mosquito larval habitats
      and olfactory-mediated behavioural responses using plant-derived compounds.
PG  - 184
LID - 10.1186/s13071-017-2122-8 [doi]
AB  - Malaria presents an overwhelming public health challenge, particularly in
      sub-Saharan Africa where vector favourable conditions and poverty prevail,
      potentiating the disease burden. Behavioural variability of malaria vectors poses
      a great challenge to existing vector control programmes with insecticide
      resistance already acquired to nearly all available chemical compounds. Thus,
      approaches incorporating plant-derived compounds to manipulate
      semiochemical-mediated behaviours through disruption of mosquito olfactory
      sensory system have considerably gained interests to interrupt malaria
      transmission cycle. The combination of push-pull methods and larval control have 
      the potential to reduce malaria vector populations, thus minimising the risk of
      contracting malaria especially in resource-constrained communities where access
      to synthetic insecticides is a challenge. In this review, we have compiled
      information regarding the current status of knowledge on manipulation of larval
      ecology and chemical-mediated behaviour of adult mosquitoes with plant-derived
      compounds for controlling mosquito populations. Further, an update on the current
      advancements in technologies to improve longevity and efficiency of these
      compounds for field applications has been provided.
FAU - Muema, Jackson M
AU  - Muema JM
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and
      Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi, Kenya. [email protected]
FAU - Bargul, Joel L
AU  - Bargul JL
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and
      Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.
AD  - Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Unit, International Centre of Insect
      Physiology and Ecology, P.O. Box 30772-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Njeru, Sospeter N
AU  - Njeru SN
AD  - Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kisii University, P.O. Box
      408-40200, Kisii, Kenya.
AD  - Present Address: Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) - Leibniz Institute of Aging
      Research, D-07745, Jena, Germany.
FAU - Onyango, Joab O
AU  - Onyango JO
AD  - Department of Chemical Science and Technology, Technical University of Kenya,
      P.O. Box 52428-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Imbahale, Susan S
AU  - Imbahale SS
AD  - Department of Applied and Technical Biology, Technical University of Kenya, P.O. 
      Box 52428-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170417
PL  - England
TA  - Parasit Vectors
JT  - Parasites & vectors
JID - 101462774
RN  - 0 (Insect Repellents)
RN  - 0 (Pheromones)
RN  - 0 (Phytochemicals)
RN  - 0 (insect attractants)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Disease Transmission, Infectious/*prevention & control
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insect Repellents/*pharmacology
MH  - Malaria/*prevention & control
MH  - Mosquito Control/*methods
MH  - Pheromones/*pharmacology
MH  - Phytochemicals/*pharmacology
PMC - PMC5392979
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Anopheline mosquitoes
OT  - Integrated vector management
OT  - Larval habitat manipulation
OT  - Malaria
OT  - Mosquito functional ecology
OT  - Plant-derived compounds
OT  - Vector control
EDAT- 2017/04/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/26 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/18 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/24 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/29 [accepted]
AID - 10.1186/s13071-017-2122-8 [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s13071-017-2122-8 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Parasit Vectors. 2017 Apr 17;10(1):184. doi: 10.1186/s13071-017-2122-8.

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