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Targeted sequencing identifies genetic polymorphisms of flavin-containing monooxygenase genes contributing to susceptibility of nicotine dependence in European American and African American.

Abstract Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death. Early studies based on samples of twins have linked the lifetime smoking practices to genetic predisposition. The flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) protein family consists of a group of enzymes that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Both FMO1 and FMO3 were potentially susceptible genes for nicotine metabolism process.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Genetic Predisposition to Disease

Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide

Keywords

flavin‐containing monooxygenase

genetic association

rare variants

targeted sequencing

Journal Title brain and behavior
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28413702
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170417
DCOM- 20170424
LR  - 20170424
IS  - 2162-3279 (Electronic)
VI  - 7
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017 Apr
TI  - Targeted sequencing identifies genetic polymorphisms of flavin-containing
      monooxygenase genes contributing to susceptibility of nicotine dependence in
      European American and African American.
PG  - e00651
LID - 10.1002/brb3.651 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death. Early studies based 
      on samples of twins have linked the lifetime smoking practices to genetic
      predisposition. The flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) protein family consists
      of a group of enzymes that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Both FMO1 and FMO3
      were potentially susceptible genes for nicotine metabolism process. METHODS: In
      this study, we investigated the potential of FMO genes to confer risk of nicotine
      dependence via deep targeted sequencing in 2,820 study subjects comprising 1,583 
      nicotine dependents and 1,237 controls from European American and African
      American. Specifically, we focused on the two genomic segments including
      FMO1,FMO3, and pseudo gene FMO6P, and aimed to investigate the potential
      association between FMO genes and nicotine dependence. Both common and
      low-frequency/rare variants were analyzed using different algorithms. The
      potential functional significance of SNPs with association signal was
      investigated with relevant bioinformatics tools. RESULTS: We identified different
      clusters of significant common variants in European (with most significant SNP
      rs6674596, p = .0004, OR = 0.67, MAF_EA = 0.14, FMO1) and African Americans (with
      the most significant SNP rs6608453, p = .001, OR = 0.64, MAF_AA = 0.1, FMO6P). No
      significant signals were identified through haplotype-based analyses. Gene
      network investigation indicated that both FMO1 and FMO3 have a strong relation
      with a variety of genes belonging to CYP gene families (with combined score
      greater than 0.9). Most of the significant variants identified were SNPs located 
      within intron regions or with unknown functional significance, indicating a need 
      for future work to understand the underlying functional significance of these
      signals. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated significant association between FMO 
      genes and nicotine dependence. Replications of our findings in other ethnic
      groups were needed in the future. Most of the significant variants identified
      were SNPs located within intronic regions or with unknown functional
      significance, indicating a need for future work to understand the underlying
      functional significance of these signals.
FAU - Zhang, Tian-Xiao
AU  - Zhang TX
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5835-8625
AD  - Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisMOUSA.
FAU - Saccone, Nancy L
AU  - Saccone NL
AD  - Department of GeneticsWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisMOUSA.
FAU - Bierut, Laura J
AU  - Bierut LJ
AD  - Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisMOUSA.
FAU - Rice, John P
AU  - Rice JP
AD  - Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisMOUSA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170315
PL  - United States
TA  - Brain Behav
JT  - Brain and behavior
JID - 101570837
RN  - EC 1.13.- (Oxygenases)
RN  - EC 1.14.13.8 (dimethylaniline monooxygenase (N-oxide forming))
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - African Americans/genetics
MH  - Algorithms
MH  - European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics
MH  - Female
MH  - Genetic Association Studies
MH  - *Genetic Predisposition to Disease
MH  - Genotyping Techniques
MH  - Haplotypes
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Oxygenases/*genetics
MH  - *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
MH  - Tobacco Use Disorder/enzymology/*ethnology/*genetics
MH  - United States
PMC - PMC5390834
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - flavin-containing monooxygenase
OT  - genetic association
OT  - rare variants
OT  - targeted sequencing
EDAT- 2017/04/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/18 06:00
PHST- 2016/05/06 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/27 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/22 [accepted]
AID - 10.1002/brb3.651 [doi]
AID - BRB3651 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Brain Behav. 2017 Mar 15;7(4):e00651. doi: 10.1002/brb3.651. eCollection 2017
      Apr.

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