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Sex differences in the interacting roles of impulsivity and positive alcohol expectancy in problem drinking: A structural brain imaging study.

Abstract Alcohol expectancy and impulsivity are implicated in alcohol misuse. However, how these two risk factors interact to determine problem drinking and whether men and women differ in these risk processes remain unclear. In 158 social drinkers (86 women) assessed for Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), positive alcohol expectancy, and Barratt impulsivity, we examined sex differences in these risk processes. Further, with structural brain imaging, we examined the neural bases underlying the relationship between these risk factors and problem drinking. The results of general linear modeling showed that alcohol expectancy best predicted problem drinking in women, whereas in men as well as in the combined group alcohol expectancy and impulsivity interacted to best predict problem drinking. Alcohol expectancy was associated with decreased gray matter volume (GMV) of the right posterior insula in women and the interaction of alcohol expectancy and impulsivity was associated with decreased GMV of the left thalamus in women and men combined and in men alone, albeit less significantly. These risk factors mediated the correlation between GMV and problem drinking. Conversely, models where GMV resulted from problem drinking were not supported. These new findings reveal distinct psychological factors that dispose men and women to problem drinking. Although mediation analyses did not determine a causal link, GMV reduction in the insula and thalamus may represent neural phenotype of these risk processes rather than the consequence of alcohol consumption in non-dependent social drinkers. The results add to the alcohol imaging literature which has largely focused on dependent individuals and help elucidate alterations in brain structures that may contribute to the transition from social to habitual drinking.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Alcoholism

Sex Characteristics

Keywords

Alcohol expectancy

Cerebral morphometry

Disinhibition

Gender difference

Insula

Social drinking

Thalamus

VBM

Journal Title neuroimage. clinical
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28413777
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170417
DCOM- 20170420
LR  - 20170420
IS  - 2213-1582 (Electronic)
IS  - 2213-1582 (Linking)
VI  - 14
DP  - 2017
TI  - Sex differences in the interacting roles of impulsivity and positive alcohol
      expectancy in problem drinking: A structural brain imaging study.
PG  - 750-759
LID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.03.015 [doi]
AB  - Alcohol expectancy and impulsivity are implicated in alcohol misuse. However, how
      these two risk factors interact to determine problem drinking and whether men and
      women differ in these risk processes remain unclear. In 158 social drinkers (86
      women) assessed for Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), positive
      alcohol expectancy, and Barratt impulsivity, we examined sex differences in these
      risk processes. Further, with structural brain imaging, we examined the neural
      bases underlying the relationship between these risk factors and problem
      drinking. The results of general linear modeling showed that alcohol expectancy
      best predicted problem drinking in women, whereas in men as well as in the
      combined group alcohol expectancy and impulsivity interacted to best predict
      problem drinking. Alcohol expectancy was associated with decreased gray matter
      volume (GMV) of the right posterior insula in women and the interaction of
      alcohol expectancy and impulsivity was associated with decreased GMV of the left 
      thalamus in women and men combined and in men alone, albeit less significantly.
      These risk factors mediated the correlation between GMV and problem drinking.
      Conversely, models where GMV resulted from problem drinking were not supported.
      These new findings reveal distinct psychological factors that dispose men and
      women to problem drinking. Although mediation analyses did not determine a causal
      link, GMV reduction in the insula and thalamus may represent neural phenotype of 
      these risk processes rather than the consequence of alcohol consumption in
      non-dependent social drinkers. The results add to the alcohol imaging literature 
      which has largely focused on dependent individuals and help elucidate alterations
      in brain structures that may contribute to the transition from social to habitual
      drinking.
FAU - Ide, Jaime S
AU  - Ide JS
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
FAU - Zhornitsky, Simon
AU  - Zhornitsky S
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
FAU - Hu, Sien
AU  - Hu S
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
AD  - Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Oswego, Oswego, NY
      13126, United States.
FAU - Zhang, Sheng
AU  - Zhang S
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
FAU - Krystal, John H
AU  - Krystal JH
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
AD  - Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06520, United States.
AD  - Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New
      Haven, CT 06520, United States.
FAU - Li, Chiang-Shan R
AU  - Li CR
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06519, United States.
AD  - Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
      06520, United States.
AD  - Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New
      Haven, CT 06520, United States.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170331
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Neuroimage Clin
JT  - NeuroImage. Clinical
JID - 101597070
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Alcohol Drinking/*psychology
MH  - *Alcoholism/diagnostic imaging/physiopathology/psychology
MH  - Brain/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Brain Mapping
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Impulsive Behavior/*physiology
MH  - Linear Models
MH  - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH  - Male
MH  - Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
MH  - *Sex Characteristics
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5385596
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Alcohol expectancy
OT  - Cerebral morphometry
OT  - Disinhibition
OT  - Gender difference
OT  - Insula
OT  - Social drinking
OT  - Thalamus
OT  - VBM
EDAT- 2017/04/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/18 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/28 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/20 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/30 [accepted]
AID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.03.015 [doi]
AID - S2213-1582(17)30074-8 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Mar 31;14:750-759. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.03.015.
      eCollection 2017.

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