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Voice disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease characterized by progressive tissue damage. In recent decades, novel treatments have greatly extended the life span of SLE patients. This creates a high demand for identifying the overarching symptoms associated with SLE and developing therapies that improve their life quality under chronic care. We hypothesized that SLE patients would present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can reduce life quality, identifying a potential SLE-related dysphonia could be relevant for the appraisal and management of this disease. We measured objective vocal parameters and perceived vocal quality with the GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain) scale in SLE patients and compared them to matched healthy controls. SLE patients also filled a questionnaire reporting perceived vocal deficits. SLE patients had significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonics to noise ratio, as well as increased jitter and shimmer. All subjective parameters of the GRBAS scale were significantly abnormal in SLE patients. Additionally, the vast majority of SLE patients (29/36) reported at least one perceived vocal deficit, with the most prevalent deficits being vocal fatigue (19/36) and hoarseness (17/36). Self-reported voice deficits were highly correlated with altered GRBAS scores. Additionally, tissue damage scores in different organ systems correlated with dysphonic symptoms, suggesting that some features of SLE-related dysphonia are due to tissue damage. Our results show that a large fraction of SLE patients suffers from perceivable dysphonia and may benefit from voice therapy in order to improve quality of life.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28414781
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170417
DCOM- 20170424
LR  - 20170424
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - Voice disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus.
PG  - e0175893
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175893 [doi]
AB  - Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease characterized by
      progressive tissue damage. In recent decades, novel treatments have greatly
      extended the life span of SLE patients. This creates a high demand for
      identifying the overarching symptoms associated with SLE and developing therapies
      that improve their life quality under chronic care. We hypothesized that SLE
      patients would present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can reduce 
      life quality, identifying a potential SLE-related dysphonia could be relevant for
      the appraisal and management of this disease. We measured objective vocal
      parameters and perceived vocal quality with the GRBAS (Grade, Roughness,
      Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain) scale in SLE patients and compared them to matched
      healthy controls. SLE patients also filled a questionnaire reporting perceived
      vocal deficits. SLE patients had significantly lower vocal intensity and
      harmonics to noise ratio, as well as increased jitter and shimmer. All subjective
      parameters of the GRBAS scale were significantly abnormal in SLE patients.
      Additionally, the vast majority of SLE patients (29/36) reported at least one
      perceived vocal deficit, with the most prevalent deficits being vocal fatigue
      (19/36) and hoarseness (17/36). Self-reported voice deficits were highly
      correlated with altered GRBAS scores. Additionally, tissue damage scores in
      different organ systems correlated with dysphonic symptoms, suggesting that some 
      features of SLE-related dysphonia are due to tissue damage. Our results show that
      a large fraction of SLE patients suffers from perceivable dysphonia and may
      benefit from voice therapy in order to improve quality of life.
FAU - de Macedo, Milena S F C
AU  - de Macedo MSFC
AD  - Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Para, Belem, Para,
      Brazil.
AD  - Ophir Loyola Hospital, Belem, Para, Brazil.
FAU - Costa, Kaue M
AU  - Costa KM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5562-6495
AD  - Institute for Neurophysiology, Interdisciplinary Center for Neuroscience, Goethe 
      University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
FAU - da Silva Filho, Manoel
AU  - da Silva Filho M
AD  - Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Para, Belem, Para,
      Brazil.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170417
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/*pathology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Quality of Life
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Voice Disorders/*diagnosis/*pathology
MH  - Voice Quality/physiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/04/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/18 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/19 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/02 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175893 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-37634 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 17;12(4):e0175893. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175893.
      eCollection 2017.

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