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Lens metabolomic profiling as a tool to understand cataractogenesis in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout reared at optimum and high temperature.

Abstract Periods of high or fluctuating seawater temperatures result in several physiological challenges for farmed salmonids, including an increased prevalence and severity of cataracts. The aim of the present study was to compare cataractogenesis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared at two temperatures, and investigate whether temperature influences lens metabolism and cataract development. Atlantic salmon (101±2 g) and rainbow trout (125±3 g) were reared in seawater at either 13°C (optimum for growth) or 19°C during the 35 days experiment (n = 4 tanks for each treatment). At the end of the experiment, the prevalence of cataracts was nearly 100% for Atlantic salmon compared to ~50% for rainbow trout, irrespective of temperature. The severity of the cataracts, as evaluated by slit-lamp inspection of the lens, was almost three fold higher in Atlantic salmon compared to rainbow trout. The global metabolic profile revealed differences in lens composition and metabolism between the two species, which may explain the observed differences in cataract susceptibility between the species. The largest differences were seen in the metabolism of amino acids, especially the histidine metabolism, and this was confirmed by a separate quantitative analysis. The global metabolic profile showed temperature dependent differences in the lens carbohydrate metabolism, osmoregulation and redox homeostasis. The results from the present study give new insight in cataractogenesis in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout reared at high temperature, in addition to identifying metabolic markers for cataract development.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28419112
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170418
LR  - 20170505
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - Lens metabolomic profiling as a tool to understand cataractogenesis in Atlantic
      salmon and rainbow trout reared at optimum and high temperature.
PG  - e0175491
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175491 [doi]
AB  - Periods of high or fluctuating seawater temperatures result in several
      physiological challenges for farmed salmonids, including an increased prevalence 
      and severity of cataracts. The aim of the present study was to compare
      cataractogenesis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and rainbow trout
      (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared at two temperatures, and investigate whether
      temperature influences lens metabolism and cataract development. Atlantic salmon 
      (101+/-2 g) and rainbow trout (125+/-3 g) were reared in seawater at either 13
      degrees C (optimum for growth) or 19 degrees C during the 35 days experiment (n =
      4 tanks for each treatment). At the end of the experiment, the prevalence of
      cataracts was nearly 100% for Atlantic salmon compared to ~50% for rainbow trout,
      irrespective of temperature. The severity of the cataracts, as evaluated by
      slit-lamp inspection of the lens, was almost three fold higher in Atlantic salmon
      compared to rainbow trout. The global metabolic profile revealed differences in
      lens composition and metabolism between the two species, which may explain the
      observed differences in cataract susceptibility between the species. The largest 
      differences were seen in the metabolism of amino acids, especially the histidine 
      metabolism, and this was confirmed by a separate quantitative analysis. The
      global metabolic profile showed temperature dependent differences in the lens
      carbohydrate metabolism, osmoregulation and redox homeostasis. The results from
      the present study give new insight in cataractogenesis in Atlantic salmon and
      rainbow trout reared at high temperature, in addition to identifying metabolic
      markers for cataract development.
FAU - Remo, Sofie Charlotte
AU  - Remo SC
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2076-1918
AD  - National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Hevroy, Ernst Morten
AU  - Hevroy EM
AD  - National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Breck, Olav
AU  - Breck O
AD  - Marine Harvest ASA, Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Olsvik, Pal Asgeir
AU  - Olsvik PA
AD  - National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Waagbo, Rune
AU  - Waagbo R
AD  - National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen, Norway.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170418
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
PMC - PMC5395160
EDAT- 2017/04/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/19 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/14 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/27 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175491 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-40088 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 18;12(4):e0175491. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175491.
      eCollection 2017.

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