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The Diverse Cellular and Animal Models to Decipher the Physiopathological Traits of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection.

Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus represents an important respiratory pathogen among the rapidly-growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Infections caused by M. abscessus are increasingly found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are often refractory to antibiotic therapy. The underlying immunopathological mechanisms of pathogenesis remain largely unknown. A major reason for the poor advances in M. abscessus research has been a lack of adequate models to study the acute and chronic stages of the disease leading to delayed progress of evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of potentially active antibiotics. However, the recent development of cellular models led to new insights in the interplay between M. abscessus with host macrophages as well as with amoebae, proposed to represent the environmental host and reservoir for non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The zebrafish embryo has also appeared as a useful alternative to more traditional models as it recapitulates the vertebrate immune system and, due to its optical transparency, allows a spatio-temporal visualization of the infection process in a living animal. More sophisticated immunocompromised mice have also been exploited recently to dissect the immune and inflammatory responses to M. abscessus. Herein, we will discuss the limitations, advantages and potential offered by these various models to study the pathophysiology of M. abscessus infection and to assess the preclinical efficacy of compounds active against this emerging human pathogen.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Mycobacterium abscessus

amoeba

chemotherapy

cystic fibrosis

infection

macrophage

mouse

zebrafish

Journal Title frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28421165
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170419
LR  - 20170423
IS  - 2235-2988 (Electronic)
IS  - 2235-2988 (Linking)
VI  - 7
DP  - 2017
TI  - The Diverse Cellular and Animal Models to Decipher the Physiopathological Traits 
      of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection.
PG  - 100
LID - 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00100 [doi]
AB  - Mycobacterium abscessus represents an important respiratory pathogen among the
      rapidly-growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Infections caused by M. abscessus
      are increasingly found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are often refractory 
      to antibiotic therapy. The underlying immunopathological mechanisms of
      pathogenesis remain largely unknown. A major reason for the poor advances in M.
      abscessus research has been a lack of adequate models to study the acute and
      chronic stages of the disease leading to delayed progress of evaluation of
      therapeutic efficacy of potentially active antibiotics. However, the recent
      development of cellular models led to new insights in the interplay between M.
      abscessus with host macrophages as well as with amoebae, proposed to represent
      the environmental host and reservoir for non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The
      zebrafish embryo has also appeared as a useful alternative to more traditional
      models as it recapitulates the vertebrate immune system and, due to its optical
      transparency, allows a spatio-temporal visualization of the infection process in 
      a living animal. More sophisticated immunocompromised mice have also been
      exploited recently to dissect the immune and inflammatory responses to M.
      abscessus. Herein, we will discuss the limitations, advantages and potential
      offered by these various models to study the pathophysiology of M. abscessus
      infection and to assess the preclinical efficacy of compounds active against this
      emerging human pathogen.
FAU - Bernut, Audrey
AU  - Bernut A
AD  - IRIM (ex-CPBS)-UMR 9004, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS),
      Infectious Disease Research Institute of Montpellier, Universite de
      MontpellierMontpellier, France.
FAU - Herrmann, Jean-Louis
AU  - Herrmann JL
AD  - UMR 1173, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Universite
      de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-YvelinesMontigny-le-Bretonneux, France.
FAU - Ordway, Diane
AU  - Ordway D
AD  - Mycobacteria Research Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and
      Pathology, Colorado State UniversityFort Collins, CO, USA.
FAU - Kremer, Laurent
AU  - Kremer L
AD  - IRIM (ex-CPBS)-UMR 9004, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS),
      Infectious Disease Research Institute of Montpellier, Universite de
      MontpellierMontpellier, France.
AD  - Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, IRIMMontpellier,
      France.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170404
PL  - Switzerland
TA  - Front Cell Infect Microbiol
JT  - Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
JID - 101585359
PMC - PMC5378707
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Mycobacterium abscessus
OT  - amoeba
OT  - chemotherapy
OT  - cystic fibrosis
OT  - infection
OT  - macrophage
OT  - mouse
OT  - zebrafish
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/15 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/14 [accepted]
AID - 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00100 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2017 Apr 4;7:100. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00100.
      eCollection 2017.

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