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High Prevalence of Virulence Genes in Specific Genotypes of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

Abstract Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains are emerging enteropathogens that have been detected worldwide. A collection of 228 aEPEC strains (121 from diarrheal patients, 27 from healthy carriers, 47 from animals and 33 from raw meats) were investigated for serotypes, virulence gene profiles and phylogenetic relationships. Sixty-six O serogroups were identified. Serogroup O51 was the most prevalent, followed by O119, O26 and O76. For the 20 virulence genes detected, statistically significant differences were observed in the overall prevalence of efa1 (lifA), nleB, nleE, set/ent, paa, and ehxA genes among strains from diarrheal patients, healthy carriers, animals and raw meats, respectively. Strains from diarrheal patients had significantly higher levels of efa1 (lifA) (29.8 vs. 0%, P = 0.0002), nleB (41.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0004), nleE (43.8 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0002) and set/ent (41.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0004) genes than strains obtained from healthy carriers. The paa gene was identified more often in isolates from raw meats (63.6 vs. 14.8%, P < 0.0001), animals (42.6 vs. 14.8%, P < 0.0122), and diarrheal patients (36.4 vs. 14.8%, P < 0.0225) than in strains obtained from healthy carriers. The ehxA gene was detected more frequently in strains from raw meats than in strains from diarrheal patients (27.3 vs. 2.5%, P = 0.0000) and healthy carriers (27.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0474). The phylogenetic marker, yjaA, was more frequently observed in strains among healthy carriers than in diarrheal patient strains. Among the 228 aEPEC strains, 79 sequence types (STs) were identified. The prominent STs, which comprised strains carrying the four OI-122 genes and lpfA, were ST40, ST328, and ST29. Overall, the results indicate that aEPEC strains isolated in China are highly heterogeneous. aEPEC strains that are potentially more pathogenic appear to be related to specific STs or clonal complexes and serotypes. The high prevalence of diarrhea-associated genes in animal or raw meat strains suggests a zoonotic transmission pathway for potentially human pathogenic aEPEC.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

E. coli

EPEC

MLST

serotyping

virulence gene

Journal Title frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28421169
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170419
DCOM- 20170425
LR  - 20170425
IS  - 2235-2988 (Electronic)
IS  - 2235-2988 (Linking)
VI  - 7
DP  - 2017
TI  - High Prevalence of Virulence Genes in Specific Genotypes of Atypical
      Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.
PG  - 109
LID - 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00109 [doi]
AB  - Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains are emerging
      enteropathogens that have been detected worldwide. A collection of 228 aEPEC
      strains (121 from diarrheal patients, 27 from healthy carriers, 47 from animals
      and 33 from raw meats) were investigated for serotypes, virulence gene profiles
      and phylogenetic relationships. Sixty-six O serogroups were identified. Serogroup
      O51 was the most prevalent, followed by O119, O26 and O76. For the 20 virulence
      genes detected, statistically significant differences were observed in the
      overall prevalence of efa1 (lifA), nleB, nleE, set/ent, paa, and ehxA genes among
      strains from diarrheal patients, healthy carriers, animals and raw meats,
      respectively. Strains from diarrheal patients had significantly higher levels of 
      efa1 (lifA) (29.8 vs. 0%, P = 0.0002), nleB (41.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0004), nleE
      (43.8 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0002) and set/ent (41.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0004) genes than
      strains obtained from healthy carriers. The paa gene was identified more often in
      isolates from raw meats (63.6 vs. 14.8%, P &lt; 0.0001), animals (42.6 vs. 14.8%, P 
      &lt; 0.0122), and diarrheal patients (36.4 vs. 14.8%, P &lt; 0.0225) than in strains
      obtained from healthy carriers. The ehxA gene was detected more frequently in
      strains from raw meats than in strains from diarrheal patients (27.3 vs. 2.5%, P 
      = 0.0000) and healthy carriers (27.3 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.0474). The phylogenetic
      marker, yjaA, was more frequently observed in strains among healthy carriers than
      in diarrheal patient strains. Among the 228 aEPEC strains, 79 sequence types
      (STs) were identified. The prominent STs, which comprised strains carrying the
      four OI-122 genes and lpfA, were ST40, ST328, and ST29. Overall, the results
      indicate that aEPEC strains isolated in China are highly heterogeneous. aEPEC
      strains that are potentially more pathogenic appear to be related to specific STs
      or clonal complexes and serotypes. The high prevalence of diarrhea-associated
      genes in animal or raw meat strains suggests a zoonotic transmission pathway for 
      potentially human pathogenic aEPEC.
FAU - Xu, Yanmei
AU  - Xu Y
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
FAU - Bai, Xiangning
AU  - Bai X
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
FAU - Jin, Yujuan
AU  - Jin Y
AD  - Longgang Center for Disease Control and PreventionShenzhen, China.
FAU - Hu, Bin
AU  - Hu B
AD  - Shandong Center for Disease Control and PreventionJinan, China.
FAU - Wang, Hong
AU  - Wang H
AD  - Zigong Center for Disease Control and PreventionZigong, China.
FAU - Sun, Hui
AU  - Sun H
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
FAU - Fan, Ruyue
AU  - Fan R
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
FAU - Fu, Shanshan
AU  - Fu S
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
FAU - Xiong, Yanwen
AU  - Xiong Y
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative 
      Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National
      Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for
      Disease Control and PreventionBeijing, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170404
PL  - Switzerland
TA  - Front Cell Infect Microbiol
JT  - Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
JID - 101585359
RN  - 0 (O Antigens)
RN  - 0 (Virulence Factors)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Carrier State/epidemiology/microbiology
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli/*classification/*genetics/isolation &amp;
      purification/pathogenicity
MH  - Epidemiologic Studies
MH  - Escherichia coli Infections/*epidemiology/microbiology/*veterinary
MH  - Genotype
MH  - Humans
MH  - Meat/*microbiology
MH  - Multilocus Sequence Typing
MH  - O Antigens/analysis
MH  - Phylogeny
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Serogroup
MH  - Virulence Factors/*genetics
PMC - PMC5378719
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - E. coli
OT  - EPEC
OT  - MLST
OT  - serotyping
OT  - virulence gene
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/26 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/21 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/17 [accepted]
AID - 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00109 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2017 Apr 4;7:109. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00109.
      eCollection 2017.

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