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Relationship and associated mechanisms between ambulatory blood pressure and clinic blood pressure with prevalent cardiovascular disease in diabetic hypertensive patients.

Abstract The present study was to compare the association between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and clinic BP (CBP) with prevalent cardiovascular diseases (CVD); and the underlying mechanism would also be investigated concurrently.Diabetic hypertensive patients were enrolled and divided into 2 groups based on presence of CVD. Twenty-four hour-ABP monitoring was performed and between-group differences were evaluated and logistic regression analysis was conducted.A total of 568 diabetic hypertensive patients were enrolled, and the mean age was 60.8 years, male accounted for 67.8%. Mean durations of diabetes mellitus and hypertension were 6.1 ± 2.7 and 5.4 ± 3.3 years, respectively, and 20.6% had prevalent CVD. Compared to patients without CVD, patients with CVD had significantly higher body mass index (BMI), plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC), and serum sodium level. No significant between-group differences in CBP were observed. However, 24 hour-SBP, daytime-SBP and nighttime-SBP were all significantly higher in patients with CVD compared to those without CVD. Pearson correlation analysis showed that BMI was positively correlated with PAC and serum sodium level. Logistic regression analyses showed that the association between clinic SBP and DBP with CVD were progressively attenuated to nonsignificant. In contrast, both ambulatory SBP and DBP were independently associated with CVD. However, after being further adjusted for PAC, no significant association was observed between ambulatory SBP and CVD.In diabetic hypertensive patients, ABP is superior to CBP in relation to CVD. The association between ambulatory SBP and CVD may be dependent on aldosterone excess.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28422891
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 16
DP  - 2017 Apr
TI  - Relationship and associated mechanisms between ambulatory blood pressure and
      clinic blood pressure with prevalent cardiovascular disease in diabetic
      hypertensive patients.
PG  - e6756
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006756 [doi]
AB  - The present study was to compare the association between ambulatory blood
      pressure (ABP) and clinic BP (CBP) with prevalent cardiovascular diseases (CVD); 
      and the underlying mechanism would also be investigated concurrently.Diabetic
      hypertensive patients were enrolled and divided into 2 groups based on presence
      of CVD. Twenty-four hour-ABP monitoring was performed and between-group
      differences were evaluated and logistic regression analysis was conducted.A total
      of 568 diabetic hypertensive patients were enrolled, and the mean age was 60.8
      years, male accounted for 67.8%. Mean durations of diabetes mellitus and
      hypertension were 6.1 +/- 2.7 and 5.4 +/- 3.3 years, respectively, and 20.6% had 
      prevalent CVD. Compared to patients without CVD, patients with CVD had
      significantly higher body mass index (BMI), plasma aldosterone concentration
      (PAC), and serum sodium level. No significant between-group differences in CBP
      were observed. However, 24 hour-SBP, daytime-SBP and nighttime-SBP were all
      significantly higher in patients with CVD compared to those without CVD. Pearson 
      correlation analysis showed that BMI was positively correlated with PAC and serum
      sodium level. Logistic regression analyses showed that the association between
      clinic SBP and DBP with CVD were progressively attenuated to nonsignificant. In
      contrast, both ambulatory SBP and DBP were independently associated with CVD.
      However, after being further adjusted for PAC, no significant association was
      observed between ambulatory SBP and CVD.In diabetic hypertensive patients, ABP is
      superior to CBP in relation to CVD. The association between ambulatory SBP and
      CVD may be dependent on aldosterone excess.
FAU - Hao, Zirui
AU  - Hao Z
AD  - The Third People's Hospital of Huizhou, Huizhou, Guangdong Province, China.
FAU - Li, Guiping
AU  - Li G
FAU - Sun, Yue
AU  - Sun Y
FAU - Liu, Yan
AU  - Liu Y
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006756 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201704210-00073 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Apr;96(16):e6756. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006756.

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