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Systematic review and meta-analysis shows a specific micronutrient profile in people with Down Syndrome: Lower blood calcium, selenium and zinc, higher red blood cell copper and zinc, and higher salivary calcium and sodium.

Abstract Different metabolic profiles as well as comorbidities are common in people with Down Syndrome (DS). Therefore it is relevant to know whether micronutrient levels in people with DS are also different. This systematic review was designed to review the literature on micronutrient levels in people with DS compared to age and sex-matched controls without DS. We identified sixty nine studies from January 1967 to April 2016 through main electronic medical databases PubMed, Scopus, and Web of knowledge. We carried out meta-analysis of the data on four essential trace elements (Cu, Fe, Se, and Zn), six minerals (Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Na, and P), and five vitamins (vitamin A, B9, B12, D, and E). People with DS showed lower blood levels of Ca (standard mean difference (SMD) = -0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.16 to -0.09), Se (SMD = -0.99; 95% CI: -1.55 to -0.43), and Zn (SMD = -1.30; 95% CI: -1.75 to -0.84), while red cell levels of Zn (SMD = 1.88; 95% CI: 0.48 to 3.28) and Cu (SMD = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.57) were higher. They had also higher salivary levels of Ca (SMD = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.33) and Na (SMD = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.39 to 1.69). Our findings that micronutrient levels are different in people with DS raise the question whether these differences are related to the different metabolic profiles, the common comorbidities or merely reflect DS.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28422987
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170419
DCOM- 20170427
LR  - 20170427
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - Systematic review and meta-analysis shows a specific micronutrient profile in
      people with Down Syndrome: Lower blood calcium, selenium and zinc, higher red
      blood cell copper and zinc, and higher salivary calcium and sodium.
PG  - e0175437
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175437 [doi]
AB  - Different metabolic profiles as well as comorbidities are common in people with
      Down Syndrome (DS). Therefore it is relevant to know whether micronutrient levels
      in people with DS are also different. This systematic review was designed to
      review the literature on micronutrient levels in people with DS compared to age
      and sex-matched controls without DS. We identified sixty nine studies from
      January 1967 to April 2016 through main electronic medical databases PubMed,
      Scopus, and Web of knowledge. We carried out meta-analysis of the data on four
      essential trace elements (Cu, Fe, Se, and Zn), six minerals (Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Na,
      and P), and five vitamins (vitamin A, B9, B12, D, and E). People with DS showed
      lower blood levels of Ca (standard mean difference (SMD) = -0.63; 95% confidence 
      interval (CI): -1.16 to -0.09), Se (SMD = -0.99; 95% CI: -1.55 to -0.43), and Zn 
      (SMD = -1.30; 95% CI: -1.75 to -0.84), while red cell levels of Zn (SMD = 1.88;
      95% CI: 0.48 to 3.28) and Cu (SMD = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.57) were higher. They
      had also higher salivary levels of Ca (SMD = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.33) and Na
      (SMD = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.39 to 1.69). Our findings that micronutrient levels are
      different in people with DS raise the question whether these differences are
      related to the different metabolic profiles, the common comorbidities or merely
      reflect DS.
FAU - Saghazadeh, Amene
AU  - Saghazadeh A
AD  - Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran
      University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
AD  - MetaCognition Interest Group (MCIG), Universal Scientific Education and Research 
      Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran.
FAU - Mahmoudi, Maryam
AU  - Mahmoudi M
AD  - Department of Cellular and Molecular Nutrition, School of Nutrition and
      Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
AD  - Dietitians and Nutrition Experts Team (DiNET), Universal Scientific Education and
      Research Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran.
FAU - Dehghani Ashkezari, Atefeh
AU  - Dehghani Ashkezari A
AD  - Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran
      University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
AD  - NeuroImmunology Research Association (NIRA), Universal Scientific Education and
      Research Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran.
FAU - Oliaie Rezaie, Nooshin
AU  - Oliaie Rezaie N
AD  - Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran
      University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
AD  - Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Expert Group (SRMEG), Universal Scientific
      Education and Research Network (USERN), Boston, MA, United States of America.
FAU - Rezaei, Nima
AU  - Rezaei N
AD  - Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran
      University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
AD  - Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Expert Group (SRMEG), Universal Scientific
      Education and Research Network (USERN), Boston, MA, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical
      Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Meta-Analysis
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170419
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
RN  - 0 (Cations, Divalent)
RN  - 0 (Cations, Monovalent)
RN  - 0 (Micronutrients)
RN  - 789U1901C5 (Copper)
RN  - 9NEZ333N27 (Sodium)
RN  - H6241UJ22B (Selenium)
RN  - J41CSQ7QDS (Zinc)
RN  - SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Calcium/*blood
MH  - Case-Control Studies
MH  - Cations, Divalent
MH  - Cations, Monovalent
MH  - Child
MH  - Copper/blood
MH  - Down Syndrome/*blood
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Micronutrients/*blood
MH  - Saliva/chemistry
MH  - Selenium/*blood
MH  - Sodium/metabolism
MH  - Zinc/*blood
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/05 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/27 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175437 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-35524 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0175437. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175437.
      eCollection 2017.

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