PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Mortality is associated with inflammation, anemia, specific diseases and treatments, and molecular markers.

Abstract Lifespan is a complex trait, and longitudinal data for humans are naturally scarce. We report the results of Cox regression and Pearson correlation analyses using data of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), with mortality data of 1518 participants (113 of which died), over a time span of more than 10 years. We found that in the Cox regression model based on the Bayesian information criterion, apart from chronological age of the participant, six baseline variables were considerably associated with higher mortality rates: smoking, mean attachment loss (i.e. loss of tooth supporting tissue), fibrinogen concentration, albumin/creatinine ratio, treated gastritis, and medication during the last 7 days. Except for smoking, the causative contribution of these variables to mortality was deemed inconclusive. In turn, four variables were found to be associated with decreased mortality rates: treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, treatment of dyslipidemia, IGF-1 and being female. Here, being female was an undisputed causative variable, the causal role of IFG-1 was deemed inconclusive, and the treatment effects were deemed protective to the degree that treated subjects feature better survival than respective controls. Using Cox modeling based on the Akaike information criterion, diabetes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and serum calcium were also associated with mortality. The latter two, together with albumin and fibrinogen, aligned with an"integrated albunemia" model of aging proposed recently.
PMID
Related Publications

Multicity study of air pollution and mortality in Latin America (the ESCALA study).

Endogenous erythropoietin and the association with inflammation and mortality in diabetic chronic kidney disease.

Atherosclerotic risk factors and renal function in the elderly: the role of hyperfibrinogenaemia and smoking. Results from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ILSA).

Impact of the 1990 Hong Kong legislation for restriction on sulfur content in fuel.

Markers of inflammation and mortality in a cohort of patients with alcohol dependence.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28422991
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170419
DCOM- 20170428
LR  - 20170428
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - Mortality is associated with inflammation, anemia, specific diseases and
      treatments, and molecular markers.
PG  - e0175909
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175909 [doi]
AB  - Lifespan is a complex trait, and longitudinal data for humans are naturally
      scarce. We report the results of Cox regression and Pearson correlation analyses 
      using data of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), with mortality data of
      1518 participants (113 of which died), over a time span of more than 10 years. We
      found that in the Cox regression model based on the Bayesian information
      criterion, apart from chronological age of the participant, six baseline
      variables were considerably associated with higher mortality rates: smoking, mean
      attachment loss (i.e. loss of tooth supporting tissue), fibrinogen concentration,
      albumin/creatinine ratio, treated gastritis, and medication during the last 7
      days. Except for smoking, the causative contribution of these variables to
      mortality was deemed inconclusive. In turn, four variables were found to be
      associated with decreased mortality rates: treatment of benign prostatic
      hypertrophy, treatment of dyslipidemia, IGF-1 and being female. Here, being
      female was an undisputed causative variable, the causal role of IFG-1 was deemed 
      inconclusive, and the treatment effects were deemed protective to the degree that
      treated subjects feature better survival than respective controls. Using Cox
      modeling based on the Akaike information criterion, diabetes, mean corpuscular
      hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and serum calcium were also
      associated with mortality. The latter two, together with albumin and fibrinogen, 
      aligned with an"integrated albunemia" model of aging proposed recently.
FAU - Moeller, Mark
AU  - Moeller M
AD  - Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research,
      Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany.
FAU - Pink, Christiane
AU  - Pink C
AD  - Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology, and
      Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Endlich, Nicole
AU  - Endlich N
AD  - Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Medicine Greifswald,
      Greifswald, Germany.
FAU - Endlich, Karlhans
AU  - Endlich K
AD  - Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Medicine Greifswald,
      Greifswald, Germany.
FAU - Grabe, Hans-Jorgen
AU  - Grabe HJ
AD  - Clinic of Psychiatry, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Volzke, Henry
AU  - Volzke H
AD  - Department of Study of Health in Pomerania/Clinical-Epidemiological Research,
      Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), partner site Greifswald,
      Greifswald, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), partner site Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Dorr, Marcus
AU  - Dorr M
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine B, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), partner site Greifswald,
      Greifswald, Germany.
FAU - Nauck, Matthias
AU  - Nauck M
AD  - Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt
      University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
FAU - Lerch, Markus M
AU  - Lerch MM
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Kohling, Rudiger
AU  - Kohling R
AD  - Institute of Physiology, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany.
FAU - Holtfreter, Birte
AU  - Holtfreter B
AD  - Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology, and
      Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Kocher, Thomas
AU  - Kocher T
AD  - Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology, and
      Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald,
      Germany.
FAU - Fuellen, Georg
AU  - Fuellen G
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4994-9829
AD  - Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research,
      Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170419
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
RN  - 0 (Albumins)
RN  - 67763-96-6 (Insulin-Like Growth Factor I)
RN  - 9001-32-5 (Fibrinogen)
RN  - AYI8EX34EU (Creatinine)
RN  - SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Albumins/metabolism
MH  - Anemia/*mortality/physiopathology
MH  - Calcium/blood
MH  - Creatinine/blood
MH  - Dyslipidemias/*drug therapy/mortality/physiopathology
MH  - Female
MH  - Fibrinogen/metabolism
MH  - Gastritis/drug therapy/*mortality/pathology
MH  - Germany/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Inflammation/mortality
MH  - Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism
MH  - Longevity/*physiology
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Periodontitis/*mortality/pathology
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - Prostatic Hyperplasia/*drug therapy/mortality/physiopathology
MH  - Protective Factors
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Sex Factors
MH  - Smoking/*mortality/physiopathology
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/01 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/02 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175909 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-43434 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0175909. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175909.
      eCollection 2017.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
</b:Sources>