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The evolution of cost-efficiency in neural networks during recovery from traumatic brain injury.

Abstract A somewhat perplexing finding in the systems neuroscience has been the observation that physical injury to neural systems may result in enhanced functional connectivity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) relative to the typical network response. The consequences of local or global enhancement of functional connectivity remain uncertain and this is particularly true for the overall metabolic cost of the network. We examine the hyperconnectivity hypothesis in a sample of 14 individuals with TBI with data collected at approximately 3, 6, and 12 months following moderate and severe TBI. As anticipated, individuals with TBI showed increased network strength and cost early after injury, but by one-year post injury hyperconnectivity was more circumscribed to frontal DMN and temporal-parietal attentional control regions. Cost in these subregions was a significant predictor of cognitive performance. Cost-efficiency analysis in the Power 264 data parcellation suggested that at 6 months post injury the network requires higher cost connections to achieve high efficiency as compared to the network 12 months post injury. These results demonstrate that networks self-organize to re-establish connectivity while balancing cost-efficiency trade-offs.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28422992
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - The evolution of cost-efficiency in neural networks during recovery from
      traumatic brain injury.
PG  - e0170541
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0170541 [doi]
AB  - A somewhat perplexing finding in the systems neuroscience has been the
      observation that physical injury to neural systems may result in enhanced
      functional connectivity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) relative to the typical network
      response. The consequences of local or global enhancement of functional
      connectivity remain uncertain and this is particularly true for the overall
      metabolic cost of the network. We examine the hyperconnectivity hypothesis in a
      sample of 14 individuals with TBI with data collected at approximately 3, 6, and 
      12 months following moderate and severe TBI. As anticipated, individuals with TBI
      showed increased network strength and cost early after injury, but by one-year
      post injury hyperconnectivity was more circumscribed to frontal DMN and
      temporal-parietal attentional control regions. Cost in these subregions was a
      significant predictor of cognitive performance. Cost-efficiency analysis in the
      Power 264 data parcellation suggested that at 6 months post injury the network
      requires higher cost connections to achieve high efficiency as compared to the
      network 12 months post injury. These results demonstrate that networks
      self-organize to re-establish connectivity while balancing cost-efficiency
      trade-offs.
FAU - Roy, Arnab
AU  - Roy A
AD  - Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
FAU - Bernier, Rachel A
AU  - Bernier RA
AD  - Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
FAU - Wang, Jianli
AU  - Wang J
AD  - Department of Radiology, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United
      States of America.
FAU - Benson, Monica
AU  - Benson M
AD  - Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
FAU - French, Jerry J Jr
AU  - French JJ Jr
AD  - Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
FAU - Good, David C
AU  - Good DC
AD  - Department of Neurology, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United
      States of America.
FAU - Hillary, Frank G
AU  - Hillary FG
AD  - Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Neurology, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United
      States of America.
AD  - Social, Life and Engineering Sciences Imaging Center, University Park,
      Pennsylvania, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170419
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2015/10/23 [received]
PHST- 2017/01/06 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0170541 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-15-46626 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0170541. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0170541.
      eCollection 2017.

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