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Vitamin D status and its association with insulin resistance among type 2 diabetics: A case -control study in Ghana.

Abstract Vitamin D plays a major role in physiological processes that modulate mineral metabolism and immune function with probable link to several chronic and infectious conditions. Emerging data suggests a possible influence of vitamin D on glucose homeostasis. This study sought to provide preliminary information on vitamin D status among Ghanaian type 2 diabetics and assessed its association with glucose homeostasis.
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Publication Year Start




PMID- 28423063
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017
TI  - Vitamin D status and its association with insulin resistance among type 2
      diabetics: A case -control study in Ghana.
PG  - e0175388
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175388 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Vitamin D plays a major role in physiological processes that modulate
      mineral metabolism and immune function with probable link to several chronic and 
      infectious conditions. Emerging data suggests a possible influence of vitamin D
      on glucose homeostasis. This study sought to provide preliminary information on
      vitamin D status among Ghanaian type 2 diabetics and assessed its association
      with glucose homeostasis. METHODS: In a case control study, 118 clinically
      diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients attending Diabetic Clinic at
      the Nkawie Government Hospital were enrolled between October and December 2015.
      Hundred healthy non-diabetics living in Nkawie district were selected as
      controls. Structured questionnaires were administered to obtain socio-demographic
      data. Venous blood samples were taken from both cases and controls to estimate
      their FBG, Lipid profile spectrophotometrically and IPTH, 25OHD by ELISA.
      Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v20.0 Statistics. RESULTS: The
      average age of the study participants was 58.81years for cases and 57.79year for 
      controls. There was vitamin D deficiency of 92.4% among T2DM cases and 60.2%
      among the non diabetic controls. Vitamin D deficiency did not significantly
      associate with HOMA-beta [T2DM: r2 = 0.0209, p = 0.1338 and Control: r2 = 0.0213,
      p = 0.2703] and HOMA-IR [T2DM: r2 = 0.0233, p = 0.1132 and Control: r2 = 0.0214, 
      p = 0.2690] in both the controls and the cases. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency 
      is prevalent in both T2DM and non-diabetics. There is no association between
      vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance or beta cell function in our study
      population. Vitamin D supplementation among type 2 diabetics is recommended.
FAU - Fondjo, Linda Ahenkorah
AU  - Fondjo LA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0252-3190
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Owiredu, William K B A
AU  - Owiredu WKBA
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Sakyi, Samuel Asamoah
AU  - Sakyi SA
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Laing, Edwin Ferguson
AU  - Laing EF
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Adotey-Kwofie, Michael Acquaye
AU  - Adotey-Kwofie MA
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Antoh, Enoch Odame
AU  - Antoh EO
AD  - Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health
      Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Detoh, Eric
AU  - Detoh E
AD  - Nkawie Government Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170419
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/19 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/25 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0175388 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-33295 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0175388. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175388.
      eCollection 2017.

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