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What pre-Columbian mummies could teach us about South American leishmaniases?

Abstract A recent report on the taxonomic profile of the human gut microbiome in pre-Columbian mummies (Santiago-Rodriguez et al. 2016) gives for the first time evidence of the presence of Leishmania DNA (sequences similar to Leishmania donovani according to the authors) that can be reminiscent of visceral leishmaniasis during the pre-Columbian era. It is commonly assumed that Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL) was introduced into the New World by the Iberian conquest. This finding is really surprising and must be put into perspective with what is known from an AVL epidemiological and historical point of view. Beside L. infantum, there are other species that are occasionally reported to cause AVL in the New World. Among these, L. colombiensis is present in the region of pre-Columbian mummies studied. Other explanations for these findings include a more ancient introduction of a visceral species of Leishmania from the Old World or the existence of a yet unidentified endemic species causing visceral leishmaniasis in South America. Unfortunately, very few molecular data are known about this very long pre-Columbian period concerning the circulating species of Leishmania and their diversity in America.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

American visceral leishmaniasis

pathogenic Leishmania species

pre-Columbian mummies

Journal Title pathogens and disease
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28423167
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170419
DCOM- 20170504
LR  - 20170504
IS  - 2049-632X (Electronic)
IS  - 2049-632X (Linking)
VI  - 75
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Apr 01
TI  - What pre-Columbian mummies could teach us about South American leishmaniases?
LID - 10.1093/femspd/ftx019 [doi]
AB  - A recent report on the taxonomic profile of the human gut microbiome in
      pre-Columbian mummies (Santiago-Rodriguez et al. 2016) gives for the first time
      evidence of the presence of Leishmania DNA (sequences similar to Leishmania
      donovani according to the authors) that can be reminiscent of visceral
      leishmaniasis during the pre-Columbian era. It is commonly assumed that
      Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of American visceral leishmaniasis
      (AVL) was introduced into the New World by the Iberian conquest. This finding is 
      really surprising and must be put into perspective with what is known from an AVL
      epidemiological and historical point of view. Beside L. infantum, there are other
      species that are occasionally reported to cause AVL in the New World. Among
      these, L. colombiensis is present in the region of pre-Columbian mummies studied.
      Other explanations for these findings include a more ancient introduction of a
      visceral species of Leishmania from the Old World or the existence of a yet
      unidentified endemic species causing visceral leishmaniasis in South America.
      Unfortunately, very few molecular data are known about this very long
      pre-Columbian period concerning the circulating species of Leishmania and their
      diversity in America.
CI  - (c) FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail:
      [email protected]
FAU - Sereno, Denis
AU  - Sereno D
AD  - IRD UMR 177 (IRD, CIRAD), Centre IRD de Montpellier, Montpellier 34394, France.
AD  - MIVEGEC/Universite de Montpellier CNRS/UMR 5244/IRD 224-Centre IRD, Montpellier
      34394, France.
FAU - Akhoundi, Mohammad
AU  - Akhoundi M
AD  - Service de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Hopital de l'Archet, Centre Hospitalier
      Universitaire de Nice, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, Nice 06003, France.
FAU - Dorkeld, Franck
AU  - Dorkeld F
AD  - INRA-UMR 1062 CBGP (INRA, IRD, CIRAD), Montpellier SupAgro, Montferrier-sur-Lez, 
      Languedoc-Roussillon 34988, France.
FAU - Oury, Bruno
AU  - Oury B
AD  - IRD UMR 177 (IRD, CIRAD), Centre IRD de Montpellier, Montpellier 34394, France.
FAU - Momen, Hooman
AU  - Momen H
AD  - Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, 21040-360 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
FAU - Perrin, Pascale
AU  - Perrin P
AD  - MIVEGEC/Universite de Montpellier CNRS/UMR 5244/IRD 224-Centre IRD, Montpellier
      34394, France.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Pathog Dis
JT  - Pathogens and disease
JID - 101595366
RN  - 0 (DNA, Protozoan)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - DNA, Protozoan
MH  - Evolution, Molecular
MH  - Humans
MH  - Leishmania/classification/genetics
MH  - Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology/*microbiology/transmission
MH  - Mummies/*microbiology
MH  - South America
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - *American visceral leishmaniasis
OT  - *pathogenic Leishmania species
OT  - *pre-Columbian mummies
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/02 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/14 [accepted]
AID - 3003283 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/femspd/ftx019 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pathog Dis. 2017 Apr 1;75(3). doi: 10.1093/femspd/ftx019.

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