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The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: our evolving understanding.

Abstract Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human respiratory tract.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Candida

colonization

respiratory tract

Journal Title pathogens and disease
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28423168
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170419
LR  - 20170419
IS  - 2049-632X (Electronic)
IS  - 2049-632X (Linking)
VI  - 75
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Apr 01
TI  - The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: our evolving
      understanding.
LID - 10.1093/femspd/ftx029 [doi]
AB  - Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus 
      in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans 
      with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While
      historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the
      status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question
      by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is 
      currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and 
      pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human
      respiratory tract.
CI  - Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written
      by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
FAU - Pendleton, Kathryn M
AU  - Pendleton KM
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
      Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
FAU - Huffnagle, Gary B
AU  - Huffnagle GB
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
      Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
AD  - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School,
      Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
AD  - Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of
      Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
AD  - Mary H. Weiser Food Allergy Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, 
      USA.
FAU - Dickson, Robert P
AU  - Dickson RP
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
      Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Pathog Dis
JT  - Pathogens and disease
JID - 101595366
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Candida
OT  - colonization
OT  - respiratory tract
EDAT- 2017/04/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/28 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/12 [accepted]
AID - 3102948 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/femspd/ftx029 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pathog Dis. 2017 Apr 1;75(3). doi: 10.1093/femspd/ftx029.

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