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Bladder Fill after Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair Reduces Time to Discharge.

Abstract Laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy (LIH) has a relatively high risk of urinary retention. Bladder dysfunction may delay discharge after LIH. We hypothesized that filling the bladder before Foley catheter removal decreases time to discharge (TTD) after LIH. A secondary aim was to determine incidence of postoperative urinary retention (POUR) after bladder fill (BF). We reviewed a consecutive series of total extraperitoneal and transabdominal preperitoneal LIH procedures performed by a single surgeon at our institution from 2010 to 2013. All patients were catheterized during LIH, and selected patients received a 200-mL saline BF before Foley catheter removal. Patients were required to void >250 mL before discharge. TTD and incidence of POUR were compared between the BF and no-BF groups. A total of 161 LIH cases were reviewed. BF was performed in 89/161 (55%) of cases. TTD was significantly shorter in the BF versus the no-BF group (222 vs 286 minutes, respectively; P < 0.01). Patient and operative characteristics were similar between the BF and no-BF groups (P > 0.05). Incidence of POUR in the BF and the no-BF group was 10.1 and 16.7 per cent, respectively; however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.22). No postoperative urinary tract infection occurred in either group. In conclusions, postoperative BF significantly reduces TTD after LIH. Further studies may help to determine whether shorter postanesthesia care unit time and lower POUR rates associated with BF can lower LIH procedural costs and increase patient satisfaction.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Laparoscopy

Patient Discharge

Urinary Catheterization

Keywords
Journal Title the american surgeon
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28424135
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170420
DCOM- 20170501
LR  - 20170501
IS  - 1555-9823 (Electronic)
IS  - 0003-1348 (Linking)
VI  - 83
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017 Apr 01
TI  - Bladder Fill after Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair Reduces Time to Discharge.
PG  - 385-389
AB  - Laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy (LIH) has a relatively high risk of urinary
      retention. Bladder dysfunction may delay discharge after LIH. We hypothesized
      that filling the bladder before Foley catheter removal decreases time to
      discharge (TTD) after LIH. A secondary aim was to determine incidence of
      postoperative urinary retention (POUR) after bladder fill (BF). We reviewed a
      consecutive series of total extraperitoneal and transabdominal preperitoneal LIH 
      procedures performed by a single surgeon at our institution from 2010 to 2013.
      All patients were catheterized during LIH, and selected patients received a
      200-mL saline BF before Foley catheter removal. Patients were required to void
      &gt;250 mL before discharge. TTD and incidence of POUR were compared between the BF 
      and no-BF groups. A total of 161 LIH cases were reviewed. BF was performed in
      89/161 (55%) of cases. TTD was significantly shorter in the BF versus the no-BF
      group (222 vs 286 minutes, respectively; P &lt; 0.01). Patient and operative
      characteristics were similar between the BF and no-BF groups (P &gt; 0.05).
      Incidence of POUR in the BF and the no-BF group was 10.1 and 16.7 per cent,
      respectively; however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.22). No
      postoperative urinary tract infection occurred in either group. In conclusions,
      postoperative BF significantly reduces TTD after LIH. Further studies may help to
      determine whether shorter postanesthesia care unit time and lower POUR rates
      associated with BF can lower LIH procedural costs and increase patient
      satisfaction.
FAU - Wormer, Blair A
AU  - Wormer BA
FAU - Ross, Samuel W
AU  - Ross SW
FAU - Walters, Amanda L
AU  - Walters AL
FAU - Kuwada, Timothy S
AU  - Kuwada TS
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am Surg
JT  - The American surgeon
JID - 0370522
RN  - 451W47IQ8X (Sodium Chloride)
SB  - IM
MH  - Female
MH  - Hernia, Inguinal/*surgery
MH  - Herniorrhaphy/*methods
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - *Laparoscopy
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Patient Discharge
MH  - Patient Satisfaction
MH  - Postoperative Complications/*epidemiology/*prevention &amp; control
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Sodium Chloride/administration &amp; dosage
MH  - Time Factors
MH  - Treatment Outcome
MH  - *Urinary Catheterization
MH  - Urinary Retention/*epidemiology/*prevention &amp; control
EDAT- 2017/04/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/21 06:00
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am Surg. 2017 Apr 1;83(4):385-389.

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