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Antifatigue Effects of Antrodia cinnamomea Cultured Mycelium via Modulation of Oxidative Stress Signaling in a Mouse Model.

Abstract Antrodia cinnamomea, a folk medicinal mushroom, has numerous biological effects. In this study, we aim to assess whether the antifatigue effects of A. cinnamomea mycelia (AC) and its underlying mechanisms are related to oxidative stress signaling using behavioral mouse models and biochemical indices detection. Mice were orally treated with AC at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.9 g/kg for three weeks. AC had no effect on the spontaneous activities of mice indicating its safety on central nervous system. Furthermore, results obtained from weight-loaded forced swimming test, rotary rod test, and exhausted running test confirmed that AC significantly enhanced exercise tolerance of mice. Biochemical indices levels showed that these effects were closely correlated with inhibiting the depletion of glycogen and adenosine triphosphate stores, regulating oxidative stress-related parameters (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, reactive oxygen species, and malondialdehyde) in serum, skeletal muscle, and liver of mice. Moreover, the effects of AC may be related with its regulation on the activations of AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin in liver and skeletal muscle of mice. Altogether, our data suggest that the antifatigue properties of AC may be one such modulation mechanism via oxidative stress-related signaling in mice.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title biomed research international
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28424791
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170420
LR  - 20170423
IS  - 2314-6141 (Electronic)
VI  - 2017
DP  - 2017
TI  - Antifatigue Effects of Antrodia cinnamomea Cultured Mycelium via Modulation of
      Oxidative Stress Signaling in a Mouse Model.
PG  - 9374026
LID - 10.1155/2017/9374026 [doi]
AB  - Antrodia cinnamomea, a folk medicinal mushroom, has numerous biological effects. 
      In this study, we aim to assess whether the antifatigue effects of A. cinnamomea 
      mycelia (AC) and its underlying mechanisms are related to oxidative stress
      signaling using behavioral mouse models and biochemical indices detection. Mice
      were orally treated with AC at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.9 g/kg for three weeks.
      AC had no effect on the spontaneous activities of mice indicating its safety on
      central nervous system. Furthermore, results obtained from weight-loaded forced
      swimming test, rotary rod test, and exhausted running test confirmed that AC
      significantly enhanced exercise tolerance of mice. Biochemical indices levels
      showed that these effects were closely correlated with inhibiting the depletion
      of glycogen and adenosine triphosphate stores, regulating oxidative
      stress-related parameters (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, reactive
      oxygen species, and malondialdehyde) in serum, skeletal muscle, and liver of
      mice. Moreover, the effects of AC may be related with its regulation on the
      activations of AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B, and mammalian
      target of rapamycin in liver and skeletal muscle of mice. Altogether, our data
      suggest that the antifatigue properties of AC may be one such modulation
      mechanism via oxidative stress-related signaling in mice.
FAU - Liu, Yange
AU  - Liu Y
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Li, Lanzhou
AU  - Li L
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - An, Shengshu
AU  - An S
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Zhang, Yuanzhu
AU  - Zhang Y
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Feng, Shiwei
AU  - Feng S
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Zhao, Lu
AU  - Zhao L
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Teng, Lirong
AU  - Teng L
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1324-877X
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
FAU - Wang, Di
AU  - Wang D
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-7322-4174
AD  - School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170323
PL  - United States
TA  - Biomed Res Int
JT  - BioMed research international
JID - 101600173
PMC - PMC5382311
EDAT- 2017/04/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/21 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/13 [received]
PHST- 2017/01/16 [revised]
PHST- 2017/02/08 [accepted]
AID - 10.1155/2017/9374026 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:9374026. doi: 10.1155/2017/9374026. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

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