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Metabolic and Electrolyte Abnormalities Related to Use of Bowel in Urologic Reconstruction.

Abstract Many urologic reconstructive techniques involve the use of autologous bowel for urinary diversion and bladder augmentation. The resection of bowel and its reimplantation into the urinary system often comes with a variety of metabolic and electrolyte derangements, depending on the type of bowel used and the quantity of urine it is exposed to in its final anatomic position. Clinicians should be aware of these potential complications due to the serious consequences that may result from uncorrected electrolyte disturbances. This article reviews the common electrolyte complications related to both bowel resection and the interposition of bowel within the urinary tract.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Bowel

Electrolyte

Metabolic

Urologic reconstruction

Journal Title the nursing clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28478876
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170508
DCOM- 20170515
LR  - 20170515
IS  - 1558-1357 (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-6465 (Linking)
VI  - 52
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - Metabolic and Electrolyte Abnormalities Related to Use of Bowel in Urologic
      Reconstruction.
PG  - 281-289
LID - S0029-6465(17)30016-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.005 [doi]
AB  - Many urologic reconstructive techniques involve the use of autologous bowel for
      urinary diversion and bladder augmentation. The resection of bowel and its
      reimplantation into the urinary system often comes with a variety of metabolic
      and electrolyte derangements, depending on the type of bowel used and the
      quantity of urine it is exposed to in its final anatomic position. Clinicians
      should be aware of these potential complications due to the serious consequences 
      that may result from uncorrected electrolyte disturbances. This article reviews
      the common electrolyte complications related to both bowel resection and the
      interposition of bowel within the urinary tract.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Squiers, Amanda N
AU  - Squiers AN
AD  - Oregon Health Science University School of Nursing, 3455 Southwest US Veterans
      Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA; Department of Urologic Surgery, Oregon
      Health Science University School of Medicine, 3455 Southwest US Veterans Hospital
      Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Twitchell, Karleena
AU  - Twitchell K
AD  - Oregon Health Science University School of Nursing, 3455 Southwest US Veterans
      Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA; Division of Cardiac and Surgical
      Subspecialty Critical Care, Department of Anesthesiology, Oregon Health Science
      University School of Medicine, 3455 Southwest US Veterans Hospital Road,
      Portland, OR 97239, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Nurs Clin North Am
JT  - The Nursing clinics of North America
JID - 0042033
RN  - 0 (Electrolytes)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
SB  - N
MH  - Electrolytes/*metabolism
MH  - Humans
MH  - Postoperative Complications/*etiology
MH  - Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/*adverse effects
MH  - Urinary Diversion/*adverse effects
MH  - Urinary Tract/*surgery
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Bowel
OT  - Electrolyte
OT  - Metabolic
OT  - Urologic reconstruction
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/09 06:00
AID - S0029-6465(17)30016-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Nurs Clin North Am. 2017 Jun;52(2):281-289. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.005.

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