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Microvascular Fluid Resuscitation in Circulatory Shock.

Abstract The microcirculation is responsible for blood flow regulation and red blood cell distribution throughout individual organs. Patients with circulatory shock have acute failure of the cardiovascular system in which there is insufficient delivery of oxygen to meet metabolic tissue requirements. All subtypes of shock pathophysiology have a hypovolemic component. Fluid resuscitation guided by systemic hemodynamic end points is a common intervention. Evidence shows that microcirculatory shock persists even after optimization of macrocirculatory hemodynamics. The ability for nurses to assess the microcirculation at the bedside in real-time during fluid resuscitation could lead to improved algorithms designed to resuscitate the microcirculation.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Fluid

Hemodynamic coherence

Microcirculation

Oxygen transport

Shock

Journal Title the nursing clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28478877
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170508
DCOM- 20170515
LR  - 20170515
IS  - 1558-1357 (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-6465 (Linking)
VI  - 52
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - Microvascular Fluid Resuscitation in Circulatory Shock.
PG  - 291-300
LID - S0029-6465(17)30017-8 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.006 [doi]
AB  - The microcirculation is responsible for blood flow regulation and red blood cell 
      distribution throughout individual organs. Patients with circulatory shock have
      acute failure of the cardiovascular system in which there is insufficient
      delivery of oxygen to meet metabolic tissue requirements. All subtypes of shock
      pathophysiology have a hypovolemic component. Fluid resuscitation guided by
      systemic hemodynamic end points is a common intervention. Evidence shows that
      microcirculatory shock persists even after optimization of macrocirculatory
      hemodynamics. The ability for nurses to assess the microcirculation at the
      bedside in real-time during fluid resuscitation could lead to improved algorithms
      designed to resuscitate the microcirculation.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Hamlin, Shannan K
AU  - Hamlin SK
AD  - Center for Professional Excellence, Institute for Academic Medicine, Houston
      Methodist, 6565 Fannin, MGJ 11-016, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
FAU - Strauss, Penelope Z
AU  - Strauss PZ
AD  - Independent Consultant, 6122 Queensloch Drive, Houston, TX 77096, USA.
FAU - Chen, Hsin-Mei
AU  - Chen HM
AD  - Institute for Academic Medicine, Houston Methodist, 6565 Fannin, MGJ 11-018,
      Houston, TX 77030, USA.
FAU - Christy, LaDonna
AU  - Christy L
AD  - Center for Professional Excellence, Houston Methodist Hospital, 6565 Fannin, MGJ 
      11-017, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170412
PL  - United States
TA  - Nurs Clin North Am
JT  - The Nursing clinics of North America
JID - 0042033
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
SB  - N
MH  - Fluid Therapy/*methods
MH  - Hemodynamics/*physiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Myocardial Infarction/*therapy
MH  - Resuscitation/*methods
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Fluid
OT  - Hemodynamic coherence
OT  - Microcirculation
OT  - Oxygen transport
OT  - Shock
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/09 06:00
AID - S0029-6465(17)30017-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Nurs Clin North Am. 2017 Jun;52(2):291-300. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.006. Epub
      2017 Apr 12.

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