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Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

Abstract Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Water-Electrolyte Balance

Keywords

Dysnatremia

Hypernatremia

Hyponatremia

Intensive care

Neurologic surgery

Journal Title the nursing clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28478880
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170508
DCOM- 20170515
LR  - 20170515
IS  - 1558-1357 (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-6465 (Linking)
VI  - 52
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.
PG  - 321-329
LID - S0029-6465(17)30020-8 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.009 [doi]
AB  - Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a
      predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of
      onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias 
      in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of
      sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition
      and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured
      patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen 
      cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Hutto, Craig
AU  - Hutto C
AD  - Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health and
      Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
FAU - French, Mindy
AU  - French M
AD  - Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health and
      Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170407
PL  - United States
TA  - Nurs Clin North Am
JT  - The Nursing clinics of North America
JID - 0042033
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
SB  - N
MH  - Critical Care/*methods
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypernatremia/*diagnosis/*therapy
MH  - Hyponatremia/*diagnosis/*therapy
MH  - *Water-Electrolyte Balance
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Dysnatremia
OT  - Hypernatremia
OT  - Hyponatremia
OT  - Intensive care
OT  - Neurologic surgery
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/09 06:00
AID - S0029-6465(17)30020-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.009 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Nurs Clin North Am. 2017 Jun;52(2):321-329. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2017.01.009. Epub
      2017 Apr 7.

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