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State HCV Incidence and Policies Related to HCV Preventive and Treatment Services for Persons Who Inject Drugs - United States, 2015-2016.

Abstract Hepatitis C is associated with more deaths in the United States than 60 other infectious diseases reported to CDC combined. Despite curative hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies and known preventive measures to interrupt transmission, new HCV infections have increased in recent years (1,2). Injection drug use is the primary risk factor for new HCV infections (2). One potential strategy to decrease the prevalence of HCV is to create and strengthen public health laws and policies aimed specifically at reducing transmission risks among persons who inject drugs. To evaluate factors affecting access to HCV preventive and treatment services, CDC assessed state laws governing access to safe injection equipment and Medicaid policies related to sobriety requirements for approval of HCV treatment for persons who inject drugs. Acute HCV incidence rates were obtained from CDC's National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS). States were categorized based on analysis of laws related to access to clean needles and syringes and Medicaid HCV treatment policies associated with sobriety requirements. In 2015, HCV incidence remained high in the United States, with rates in 17 states exceeding the national average. Three states were determined to have state laws and Medicaid policies capable of comprehensively preventing and treating HCV among persons who inject drugs. Opportunities exist for states to adopt laws and policies that could help increase access to HCV preventive and treatment services reducing the number of persons at risk for HCV transmission and disease.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28493854
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170511
DCOM- 20170516
LR  - 20170516
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 18
DP  - 2017 May 12
TI  - State HCV Incidence and Policies Related to HCV Preventive and Treatment Services
      for Persons Who Inject Drugs - United States, 2015-2016.
PG  - 465-469
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a2 [doi]
AB  - Hepatitis C is associated with more deaths in the United States than 60 other
      infectious diseases reported to CDC combined. Despite curative hepatitis C virus 
      (HCV) therapies and known preventive measures to interrupt transmission, new HCV 
      infections have increased in recent years (1,2). Injection drug use is the
      primary risk factor for new HCV infections (2). One potential strategy to
      decrease the prevalence of HCV is to create and strengthen public health laws and
      policies aimed specifically at reducing transmission risks among persons who
      inject drugs. To evaluate factors affecting access to HCV preventive and
      treatment services, CDC assessed state laws governing access to safe injection
      equipment and Medicaid policies related to sobriety requirements for approval of 
      HCV treatment for persons who inject drugs. Acute HCV incidence rates were
      obtained from CDC's National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS).
      States were categorized based on analysis of laws related to access to clean
      needles and syringes and Medicaid HCV treatment policies associated with sobriety
      requirements. In 2015, HCV incidence remained high in the United States, with
      rates in 17 states exceeding the national average. Three states were determined
      to have state laws and Medicaid policies capable of comprehensively preventing
      and treating HCV among persons who inject drugs. Opportunities exist for states
      to adopt laws and policies that could help increase access to HCV preventive and 
      treatment services reducing the number of persons at risk for HCV transmission
      and disease.
FAU - Campbell, Cecily A
AU  - Campbell CA
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
FAU - Canary, Lauren
AU  - Canary L
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
FAU - Smith, Nicole
AU  - Smith N
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
FAU - Teshale, Eyasu
AU  - Teshale E
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
FAU - Ryerson, A Blythe
AU  - Ryerson AB
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
FAU - Ward, John W
AU  - Ward JW
AD  - Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, 
      and TB Prevention, CDC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170512
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Health Policy/*legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Health Services Accessibility/legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Hepatitis C/*epidemiology/*prevention & control
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Substance Abuse, Intravenous/*complications
MH  - United States/epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/05/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/12 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 May 12;66(18):465-469. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a2.

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