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Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Cholera Vaccine.

Abstract Cholera, caused by infection with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae bacteria of serogroup O1 (>99% of global cases) or O139, is characterized by watery diarrhea that can be severe and rapidly fatal without prompt rehydration. Cholera is endemic in approximately 60 countries and causes epidemics as well. Globally, cholera results in an estimated 2.9 million cases of disease and 95,000 deaths annually (1). Cholera is rare in the United States, and most U.S. cases occur among travelers to countries where cholera is endemic or epidemic. Forty-two U.S. cases were reported in 2011 after a cholera epidemic began in Haiti (2); however, <25 cases per year have been reported in the United States since 2012.
PMID
Related Publications

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Cholera vaccines.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28493859
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170511
DCOM- 20170516
LR  - 20170516
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 18
DP  - 2017 May 12
TI  - Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of
      Cholera Vaccine.
PG  - 482-485
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a6 [doi]
AB  - Cholera, caused by infection with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae bacteria of serogroup
      O1 (&gt;99% of global cases) or O139, is characterized by watery diarrhea that can
      be severe and rapidly fatal without prompt rehydration. Cholera is endemic in
      approximately 60 countries and causes epidemics as well. Globally, cholera
      results in an estimated 2.9 million cases of disease and 95,000 deaths annually
      (1). Cholera is rare in the United States, and most U.S. cases occur among
      travelers to countries where cholera is endemic or epidemic. Forty-two U.S. cases
      were reported in 2011 after a cholera epidemic began in Haiti (2); however, &lt;25
      cases per year have been reported in the United States since 2012.
FAU - Wong, Karen K
AU  - Wong KK
FAU - Burdette, Erin
AU  - Burdette E
FAU - Mahon, Barbara E
AU  - Mahon BE
FAU - Mintz, Eric D
AU  - Mintz ED
FAU - Ryan, Edward T
AU  - Ryan ET
FAU - Reingold, Arthur L
AU  - Reingold AL
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Practice Guideline
DEP - 20170512
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
RN  - 0 (Cholera Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Advisory Committees
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Cholera/*prevention &amp; control
MH  - Cholera Vaccines/*administration &amp; dosage
MH  - Humans
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Travel
MH  - United States
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/05/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/12 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a6 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 May 12;66(18):482-485. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a6.

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