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Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Women Giving Birth - Tennessee and United States, 2009-2014.

Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects an estimated 3.5 million persons in the United States (1), making it the most common bloodborne infection in the country. Recent surveillance data showed increased rates of HCV infection among adolescents and adults who are predominantly white, live in nonurban areas, and have a history of injection drug use.* U.S. birth certificate data were used to analyze trends and geographic variations in rates of HCV infection among women giving birth during 2009-2014. Birth certificates from Tennessee were used to examine individual characteristics and outcomes associated with HCV infection, using a multivariable model to calculate adjusted odds of HCV-related diagnosis in pregnancy among women with live births. During 2009-2014, HCV infection present at the time of delivery among pregnant women from states reporting HCV on the birth certificate increased 89%, from 1.8 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births. The highest infection rate in 2014 (22.6 per 1,000 live births) was in West Virginia; the rate in Tennessee was 10.1. In adjusted analyses of Tennessee births, the odds of HCV infection were approximately threefold higher among women residing in rural counties than among those in large urban counties, 4.5-fold higher among women who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, and nearly 17-fold higher among women with concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HCV infection among pregnant women is an increasing and potentially modifiable threat to maternal and child health. Clinicians and public health officials should consider individual and population-level opportunities for prevention and risk mitigation.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28493860
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170511
DCOM- 20170516
LR  - 20170516
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 18
DP  - 2017 May 12
TI  - Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Women Giving Birth - Tennessee and United
      States, 2009-2014.
PG  - 470-473
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a3 [doi]
AB  - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects an estimated 3.5 million persons in the United
      States (1), making it the most common bloodborne infection in the country. Recent
      surveillance data showed increased rates of HCV infection among adolescents and
      adults who are predominantly white, live in nonurban areas, and have a history of
      injection drug use.* U.S. birth certificate data were used to analyze trends and 
      geographic variations in rates of HCV infection among women giving birth during
      2009-2014. Birth certificates from Tennessee were used to examine individual
      characteristics and outcomes associated with HCV infection, using a multivariable
      model to calculate adjusted odds of HCV-related diagnosis in pregnancy among
      women with live births. During 2009-2014, HCV infection present at the time of
      delivery among pregnant women from states reporting HCV on the birth certificate 
      increased 89%, from 1.8 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births. The highest infection rate 
      in 2014 (22.6 per 1,000 live births) was in West Virginia; the rate in Tennessee 
      was 10.1. In adjusted analyses of Tennessee births, the odds of HCV infection
      were approximately threefold higher among women residing in rural counties than
      among those in large urban counties, 4.5-fold higher among women who smoked
      cigarettes during pregnancy, and nearly 17-fold higher among women with
      concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HCV infection among pregnant women 
      is an increasing and potentially modifiable threat to maternal and child health. 
      Clinicians and public health officials should consider individual and
      population-level opportunities for prevention and risk mitigation.
FAU - Patrick, Stephen W
AU  - Patrick SW
FAU - Bauer, Audrey M
AU  - Bauer AM
FAU - Warren, Michael D
AU  - Warren MD
FAU - Jones, Timothy F
AU  - Jones TF
FAU - Wester, Carolyn
AU  - Wester C
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170512
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Female
MH  - Hepatitis C/*epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/*epidemiology
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Tennessee/epidemiology
MH  - United States/epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/05/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/12 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a3 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 May 12;66(18):470-473. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a3.

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