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Increased use of police and health-related services among those with heavy drinkers in their lives in New Zealand.

Abstract To report population estimates of service use because of someone else's drinking in New Zealand, investigate whether greater exposure to heavy drinkers relates to greater service use and examine demographic predictors of such service use.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the new zealand medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28494482
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170511
DCOM- 20170518
LR  - 20170518
IS  - 1175-8716 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-8446 (Linking)
VI  - 130
IP  - 1455
DP  - 2017 May 12
TI  - Increased use of police and health-related services among those with heavy
      drinkers in their lives in New Zealand.
PG  - 102-110
AB  - AIMS: To report population estimates of service use because of someone else's
      drinking in New Zealand, investigate whether greater exposure to heavy drinkers
      relates to greater service use and examine demographic predictors of such service
      use. METHODS: A general population survey of respondents aged 12-80 years was
      conducted in New Zealand. The sample size was 3,068 and response rate 64%.
      Respondents' use of police and health-related services because of someone else's 
      drinking were measured along with self-reports of heavy drinkers in their lives, 
      demographic variables and own drinking. RESULTS: Ten percent of New Zealanders
      reported having called the police at least once in the past 12 months because of 
      someone else's drinking-corresponding to 378,843 New Zealanders making at least
      one call to police. Almost 7% of the sample, representing 257,613 New Zealanders,
      reported requiring health-related services at least once for the same reason.
      CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable numbers of New Zealanders requiring
      intervention from police or health-related services due to the effects of someone
      else's drinking. Further, increased exposure to heavy drinkers among respondents 
      predicted increased service use. Heavy drinkers place increased burden on police 
      and health-related services, not only because of directly attributable effects
      but because they impact others.
FAU - Huckle, Taisia
AU  - Huckle T
AD  - Senior Researcher, SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, College of Health, Massey
      University, Auckland.
FAU - Wong, Khoon
AU  - Wong K
AD  - Biostatistician, Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University,
      Wellington.
FAU - Parker, Karl
AU  - Parker K
AD  - Statistician, SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, College of Health, Massey
      University, Auckland.
FAU - Casswell, Sally
AU  - Casswell S
AD  - Director, SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, College of Health, Massey University, 
      Auckland.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170512
PL  - New Zealand
TA  - N Z Med J
JT  - The New Zealand medical journal
JID - 0401067
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Alcoholism/*epidemiology
MH  - Child
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Services/*utilization
MH  - Health Surveys
MH  - Humans
MH  - Logistic Models
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - New Zealand/epidemiology
MH  - Police/*utilization
MH  - Young Adult
COI - Nil.
EDAT- 2017/05/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/19 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/12 06:00
PST - epublish
SO  - N Z Med J. 2017 May 12;130(1455):102-110.

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