PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Reprogramming cells from Gulf War veterans into neurons to study Gulf War illness.

Abstract Gulf War illness (GWI), which afflicts at least 25% of veterans who served in the 1990-1991 war in the Persian Gulf, is thought to be caused by deployment exposures to various neurotoxicants, including pesticides, anti-nerve gas pills, and low-level nerve agents including sarin/cyclosarin. GWI is a multisymptom disorder characterized by fatigue, joint pain, cognitive problems, and gastrointestinal complaints. The most prominent symptoms of GWI (memory problems, poor attention/concentration, chronic headaches, mood alterations, and impaired sleep) suggest that the disease primarily affects the CNS. Development of urgently needed treatments depends on experimental models appropriate for testing mechanistic hypotheses and for screening therapeutic compounds. Rodent models have been useful thus far, but are limited by their inability to assess the contribution of genetic or epigenetic background to the disease, and because disease-vulnerable proteins and pathways may be different in humans relative to rodents. As of yet, no postmortem tissue from the veterans has become available for research. We are moving forward with a paradigm shift in the study of GWI, which utilizes contemporary stem cell technology to convert somatic cells from Gulf War veterans into pluripotent cell lines that can be differentiated into various cell types, including neurons, glia, muscle, or other relevant cell types. Such cell lines are immortal and will be a resource for GWI researchers to pursue mechanistic hypotheses and therapeutics.
PMID
Related Publications

Mood and memory deficits in a model of Gulf War illness are linked with reduced neurogenesis, partial neuron loss, and mild inflammation in the hippocampus.

Gulf War illness: an overview of events, most prevalent health outcomes, exposures, and clues as to pathogenesis.

Butyrylcholinesterase genotype and enzyme activity in relation to Gulf War illness: preliminary evidence of gene-exposure interaction from a case-control study of 1991 Gulf War veterans.

Complex factors in the etiology of Gulf War illness: wartime exposures and risk factors in veteran subgroups.

Recent research on Gulf War illness and other health problems in veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: Effects of toxicant exposures during deployment.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title neurology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28507260
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170516
LR  - 20170516
IS  - 1526-632X (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-3878 (Linking)
VI  - 88
IP  - 20
DP  - 2017 May 16
TI  - Reprogramming cells from Gulf War veterans into neurons to study Gulf War
      illness.
PG  - 1968-1975
LID - 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003938 [doi]
AB  - Gulf War illness (GWI), which afflicts at least 25% of veterans who served in the
      1990-1991 war in the Persian Gulf, is thought to be caused by deployment
      exposures to various neurotoxicants, including pesticides, anti-nerve gas pills, 
      and low-level nerve agents including sarin/cyclosarin. GWI is a multisymptom
      disorder characterized by fatigue, joint pain, cognitive problems, and
      gastrointestinal complaints. The most prominent symptoms of GWI (memory problems,
      poor attention/concentration, chronic headaches, mood alterations, and impaired
      sleep) suggest that the disease primarily affects the CNS. Development of
      urgently needed treatments depends on experimental models appropriate for testing
      mechanistic hypotheses and for screening therapeutic compounds. Rodent models
      have been useful thus far, but are limited by their inability to assess the
      contribution of genetic or epigenetic background to the disease, and because
      disease-vulnerable proteins and pathways may be different in humans relative to
      rodents. As of yet, no postmortem tissue from the veterans has become available
      for research. We are moving forward with a paradigm shift in the study of GWI,
      which utilizes contemporary stem cell technology to convert somatic cells from
      Gulf War veterans into pluripotent cell lines that can be differentiated into
      various cell types, including neurons, glia, muscle, or other relevant cell
      types. Such cell lines are immortal and will be a resource for GWI researchers to
      pursue mechanistic hypotheses and therapeutics.
CI  - (c) 2017 American Academy of Neurology.
FAU - Qiang, Liang
AU  - Qiang L
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - Rao, Anand N
AU  - Rao AN
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - Mostoslavsky, Gustavo
AU  - Mostoslavsky G
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - James, Marianne F
AU  - James MF
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - Comfort, Nicole
AU  - Comfort N
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - Sullivan, Kimberly
AU  - Sullivan K
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
FAU - Baas, Peter W
AU  - Baas PW
AD  - From the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy (L.Q., A.N.R., P.W.B.), Drexel
      University, Philadelphia, PA; and Center for Regenerative Medicine (G.M., M.F.J.)
      and School of Public Health (N.C., K.S.), Boston University, Boston, MA.
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Neurology
JT  - Neurology
JID - 0401060
EDAT- 2017/05/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/17 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/30 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/23 [accepted]
AID - WNL.0000000000003938 [pii]
AID - 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003938 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Neurology. 2017 May 16;88(20):1968-1975. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003938.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
</b:Sources>