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An Approach to Assess the Burden of Work-Related Injury, Disease, and Distress.

Abstract The true burden (morbidity, mortality, disability, cost, pain, distress) of occupational and work-related diseases and injuries is unknown, and what is reported as burden is significantly underestimated. This underestimation affects the way decision-makers view investments in research and worker protection, which in turn has a substantial impact on national welfare and public health. To better describe the societal and individual burdens of occupational and work-related diseases and injuries, we propose an approach to gauge what is known about burden and where new assessments may be made. This approach consists of 4 elements to consider in burden assessments: (1) utilizing multiple domains, including the individual worker, the worker's family, the community in which the workplace is located, the employer, and society as a whole; (2) taking a broader view of the work-relatedness of disease and injury; (3) assessing the impact of the entire working-life continuum; and (4) applying the comprehensive concept of "well-being" as an indicator in addressing contemporary changes in the nature of work, the workplace, and the workforce. Further research on burden and enhanced surveillance is needed to develop these elements.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title american journal of public health
Publication Year Start


 


PMID- 28520495
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170518
DCOM- 20170626
LR  - 20170626
IS  - 1541-0048 (Electronic)
IS  - 0090-0036 (Linking)
VI  - 107
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - An Approach to Assess the Burden of Work-Related Injury, Disease, and Distress.
PG  - 1051-1057
LID - 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303765 [doi]
AB  - The true burden (morbidity, mortality, disability, cost, pain, distress) of
      occupational and work-related diseases and injuries is unknown, and what is
      reported as burden is significantly underestimated. This underestimation affects 
      the way decision-makers view investments in research and worker protection, which
      in turn has a substantial impact on national welfare and public health. To better
      describe the societal and individual burdens of occupational and work-related
      diseases and injuries, we propose an approach to gauge what is known about burden
      and where new assessments may be made. This approach consists of 4 elements to
      consider in burden assessments: (1) utilizing multiple domains, including the
      individual worker, the worker's family, the community in which the workplace is
      located, the employer, and society as a whole; (2) taking a broader view of the
      work-relatedness of disease and injury; (3) assessing the impact of the entire
      working-life continuum; and (4) applying the comprehensive concept of
      "well-being" as an indicator in addressing contemporary changes in the nature of 
      work, the workplace, and the workforce. Further research on burden and enhanced
      surveillance is needed to develop these elements.
FAU - Schulte, Paul A
AU  - Schulte PA
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Pana-Cryan, Rene
AU  - Pana-Cryan R
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Schnorr, Teresa
AU  - Schnorr T
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Schill, Anita L
AU  - Schill AL
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Guerin, Rebecca
AU  - Guerin R
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Felknor, Sarah
AU  - Felknor S
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
FAU - Wagner, Gregory R
AU  - Wagner GR
AD  - At the time of the study, the authors were with the National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Paul 
      A. Schulte, Teresa Schnorr, and Rebecca Guerin in Cincinnati, OH; Rene Pana-Cryan
      and Anita L. Schill in Washington, DC; Sarah Felknor in Atlanta, GA; and Gregory 
      R. Wagner in Boston, MA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170518
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Public Health
JT  - American journal of public health
JID - 1254074
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Administrative Personnel
MH  - Disabled Persons/psychology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Occupational Diseases/*economics/mortality/prevention & control
MH  - Occupational Injuries/*economics/mortality/prevention & control
MH  - Public Health
MH  - Stress, Psychological/psychology
MH  - Workplace/*organization & administration/psychology
EDAT- 2017/05/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/27 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/19 06:00
AID - 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303765 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Public Health. 2017 Jul;107(7):1051-1057. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303765.
      Epub 2017 May 18.