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Grief and Burnout in the PICU.

Abstract Doctors and nurses who work in PICUs often deal with emotionally difficult events. These events take a toll. They can cause long-term psychological problems that, if not addressed, can impair the ability of doctors and nurses to care for patients in a competent and compassionate manner. Furthermore, effective treatment is available. But there is a paradox. To get treatment, one must acknowledge the problem. Acknowledgment of the problem may not be encouraged, or may be discouraged and stigmatized, in the intensive care culture. This article describes a case in which a physician has classic signs of overwhelming grief and burnout, and it discusses the appropriate response.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Grief

Intensive Care Units

Keywords
Journal Title pediatrics
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28557751
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170530
DCOM- 20170810
LR  - 20170810
IS  - 1098-4275 (Electronic)
IS  - 0031-4005 (Linking)
VI  - 139
IP  - 5
DP  - 2017 May
TI  - Grief and Burnout in the PICU.
LID - e20164041 [pii]
LID - 10.1542/peds.2016-4041 [doi]
AB  - Doctors and nurses who work in PICUs often deal with emotionally difficult
      events. These events take a toll. They can cause long-term psychological problems
      that, if not addressed, can impair the ability of doctors and nurses to care for 
      patients in a competent and compassionate manner. Furthermore, effective
      treatment is available. But there is a paradox. To get treatment, one must
      acknowledge the problem. Acknowledgment of the problem may not be encouraged, or 
      may be discouraged and stigmatized, in the intensive care culture. This article
      describes a case in which a physician has classic signs of overwhelming grief and
      burnout, and it discusses the appropriate response.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
FAU - Crowe, Suzanne
AU  - Crowe S
AD  - Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland.
AD  - University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; and.
FAU - Sullivant, Shayla
AU  - Sullivant S
AD  - Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences.
FAU - Miller-Smith, Laura
AU  - Miller-Smith L
AD  - Division of Critical Care Medicine, and.
FAU - Lantos, John D
AU  - Lantos JD
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170418
PL  - United States
TA  - Pediatrics
JT  - Pediatrics
JID - 0376422
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Burnout, Professional/etiology/*psychology
MH  - Female
MH  - *Grief
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Intensive Care Units
MH  - Pediatricians/*psychology
MH  - Physician Impairment/*psychology
MH  - Stress, Psychological/*etiology/therapy
COI - POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential
      conflicts of interest to disclose.
EDAT- 2017/05/31 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/31 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/05 [accepted]
AID - peds.2016-4041 [pii]
AID - 10.1542/peds.2016-4041 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pediatrics. 2017 May;139(5). pii: e20164041. doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-4041. Epub
      2017 Apr 18.