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Body mass index and risk of diabetic retinopathy: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

Abstract Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a frequent cause of acquired blindness worldwide. Various studies have reported the effects of body mass index (BMI) on the risk of DR, but the results remain controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and the risk of DR.A systematic search was performed using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Embase databases to obtain articles published through December 2016. Articles regarding the association between BMI and the risk of DR were retrieved. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were included and then pooled with a random effects model.A total of 27 articles were included in this meta-analysis. When BMI was analyzed as a categorical variable, neither being overweight (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.75-1.07; P = .21; I = 65%) nor obesity (OR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.73-1.30; P = .86) were associated with an increased risk of DR when compared with normal weight. When BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, a higher BMI was not associated with an increased risk of DR (OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.97-1.01; P = .25; I2 = 79%). The pooled results did not significantly change after the sensitivity analysis.Based on the current publications, neither being overweight nor obesity is associated with an increased risk of DR. Further studies should confirm these findings.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28562529
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170531
LR  - 20170531
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 22
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - Body mass index and risk of diabetic retinopathy: A meta-analysis and systematic 
      review.
PG  - e6754
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006754 [doi]
AB  - Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a frequent cause of acquired blindness worldwide.
      Various studies have reported the effects of body mass index (BMI) on the risk of
      DR, but the results remain controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was
      performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and the risk of DR.A
      systematic search was performed using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Embase
      databases to obtain articles published through December 2016. Articles regarding 
      the association between BMI and the risk of DR were retrieved. The adjusted odds 
      ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were included and then
      pooled with a random effects model.A total of 27 articles were included in this
      meta-analysis. When BMI was analyzed as a categorical variable, neither being
      overweight (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.75-1.07; P = .21; I = 65%) nor obesity (OR =
      0.97, 95% CI 0.73-1.30; P = .86) were associated with an increased risk of DR
      when compared with normal weight. When BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable,
      a higher BMI was not associated with an increased risk of DR (OR = 0.99, 95% CI
      0.97-1.01; P = .25; I2 = 79%). The pooled results did not significantly change
      after the sensitivity analysis.Based on the current publications, neither being
      overweight nor obesity is associated with an increased risk of DR. Further
      studies should confirm these findings.
FAU - Zhou, Yue
AU  - Zhou Y
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang
      University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China.
FAU - Zhang, Yuezhi
AU  - Zhang Y
FAU - Shi, Ke
AU  - Shi K
FAU - Wang, Changyun
AU  - Wang C
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/06/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/01 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006754 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201706020-00005 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jun;96(22):e6754. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006754.

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