PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

The structural changes of upper airway and newly developed sleep breathing disorders after surgical treatment in class III malocclusion subjects.

Abstract Bimaxillary surgery is the traditional treatment of choice for correcting class III malocclusion which is reported to cause an alteration of oropharyngeal structures and upper airway narrowing that might be a predisposing factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study aimed to analyze sleep parameters in class III malocclusion subjects and ascertain the prevalence of snoring or OSA following bimaxillary surgery.A total of 22 patients with Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback for class III malocclusion were prospectively enrolled. All patients received endoscopic examination, cephalometry, 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT), and sleep study twice at 1 month before and 3 months after surgery.The patient population consisted of 5 males and 17 females with a mean body mass index of 22.5 kg/m and mean age of 22.1 years. No patients complained of sleep-related symptoms, and the results of sleep study showed normal values before surgery. Three patients (13%) were newly diagnosed with mild or moderate OSA and 6 patients (27%) showed increased loudness of snoring (over 40 dB) after bimaxillary surgery. According to cephalometric analysis and 3D-CT results, the retropalatal and retroglossal areas were significantly narrowed in class III malocclusion patients, showing snoring and sleep apnea after surgery. In addition, the total volume of the upper airway was considerably reduced following surgery in the same patients.Postoperative narrowing of the upper airway and a reduction of total upper airway volume can be induced, and causes snoring and OSA in class III malocclusion subjects following bimaxillary surgery.
PMID
Related Publications

Two- and three-dimensional evaluation of the upper airway after bimaxillary correction of Class III malocclusion.

Effects of mandibular setback surgery on upper airway dimensions and their influence on obstructive sleep apnoea - a systematic review.

Evaluation of pharyngeal airway space changes after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with a 3-dimensional simulation and modeling program.

Effect of bimaxillary rotational setback surgery on upper airway structure in skeletal class III deformities.

Volumetric changes in the upper airway after bimaxillary surgery for skeletal class III malocclusions: a case series study using 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28562535
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170531
LR  - 20170531
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 22
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - The structural changes of upper airway and newly developed sleep breathing
      disorders after surgical treatment in class III malocclusion subjects.
PG  - e6873
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006873 [doi]
AB  - Bimaxillary surgery is the traditional treatment of choice for correcting class
      III malocclusion which is reported to cause an alteration of oropharyngeal
      structures and upper airway narrowing that might be a predisposing factor for
      obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study aimed to analyze sleep parameters in
      class III malocclusion subjects and ascertain the prevalence of snoring or OSA
      following bimaxillary surgery.A total of 22 patients with Le Fort I osteotomy and
      mandibular setback for class III malocclusion were prospectively enrolled. All
      patients received endoscopic examination, cephalometry, 3-dimensional computed
      tomography (3D-CT), and sleep study twice at 1 month before and 3 months after
      surgery.The patient population consisted of 5 males and 17 females with a mean
      body mass index of 22.5 kg/m and mean age of 22.1 years. No patients complained
      of sleep-related symptoms, and the results of sleep study showed normal values
      before surgery. Three patients (13%) were newly diagnosed with mild or moderate
      OSA and 6 patients (27%) showed increased loudness of snoring (over 40 dB) after 
      bimaxillary surgery. According to cephalometric analysis and 3D-CT results, the
      retropalatal and retroglossal areas were significantly narrowed in class III
      malocclusion patients, showing snoring and sleep apnea after surgery. In
      addition, the total volume of the upper airway was considerably reduced following
      surgery in the same patients.Postoperative narrowing of the upper airway and a
      reduction of total upper airway volume can be induced, and causes snoring and OSA
      in class III malocclusion subjects following bimaxillary surgery.
FAU - Lee, Ui Lyong
AU  - Lee UL
AD  - aDepartment of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery bDepartment of Oral and
      Maxillofacial Surgery cChung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of
      Otorhinolaryngology, Seoul University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
FAU - Oh, Hoon
AU  - Oh H
FAU - Min, Sang Ki
AU  - Min SK
FAU - Shin, Ji Ho
AU  - Shin JH
FAU - Kang, Yong Seok
AU  - Kang YS
FAU - Lee, Won Wook
AU  - Lee WW
FAU - Han, Young Eun
AU  - Han YE
FAU - Choi, Young Jun
AU  - Choi YJ
FAU - Kim, Hyun Jik
AU  - Kim HJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/06/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/01 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000006873 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201706020-00011 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jun;96(22):e6873. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006873.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
</b:Sources>