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Examining Burnout, Depression, and Self-Compassion in Veterans Affairs Mental Health Staff.

Abstract Burnout, a state of emotional exhaustion associated with negative personal and occupational outcomes, is prevalent among healthcare providers. A better understanding of the psychological factors that may be associated with resilience to burnout is essential to develop effective interventions. Self-compassion, which includes kindness toward oneself, recognition of suffering as part of shared human experience, mindfulness, and nonjudgment toward inadequacies and failures, may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between burnout, depression, and self-compassion in Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health staff.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Attitude of Health Personnel

Self Concept

Keywords

burnout

healthcare

resilience

self-compassion

stress

Journal Title journal of alternative and complementary medicine (new york, n.y.)
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28590766
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170607
DCOM- 20170905
LR  - 20170906
IS  - 1557-7708 (Electronic)
IS  - 1075-5535 (Linking)
VI  - 23
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - Examining Burnout, Depression, and Self-Compassion in Veterans Affairs Mental
      Health Staff.
PG  - 551-557
LID - 10.1089/acm.2017.0087 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: Burnout, a state of emotional exhaustion associated with negative
      personal and occupational outcomes, is prevalent among healthcare providers. A
      better understanding of the psychological factors that may be associated with
      resilience to burnout is essential to develop effective interventions.
      Self-compassion, which includes kindness toward oneself, recognition of suffering
      as part of shared human experience, mindfulness, and nonjudgment toward
      inadequacies and failures, may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was 
      to examine the relationships between burnout, depression, and self-compassion in 
      Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health staff. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
      SETTING: VA medical center and affiliated community-based clinics. PARTICIPANTS: 
      VA mental health staff. OUTCOME MEASURES: The 19-item Copenhagen Burnout
      Inventory, the 26-item Self-Compassion Scale, and the Patient Health
      Questionnaire 2-item depression screen. Demographic information included age,
      sex, years worked in current position, and number of staff supervised. RESULTS:
      One hundred and twenty-eight of a potential 379 individuals (33.8%) responded.
      Clerical support, nursing, social work, psychology, and psychiatry were the major
      professions represented. Self-compassion was inversely correlated with burnout (r
      = -0.41, p < 0.001), and inversely correlated with depression (rpb = -0.39, p <
      0.001). The inverse relationship between self-compassion and burnout remained
      significant even after accounting for depressive symptoms and demographic
      variables in a multiple linear regression model. Of all the variables examined,
      self-compassion was the strongest predictor of burnout. CONCLUSIONS: The results 
      of this study support the hypothesis that self-compassion may be associated with 
      resilience to burnout. Alternatively, decreased self-compassion may be a
      downstream effect of increased burnout. Prospective, longitudinal studies are
      needed to determine the directional relationship between these factors, and
      whether interventions that cultivate self-compassion may decrease burnout and/or 
      protect against its negative personal and professional outcomes.
FAU - Atkinson, David M
AU  - Atkinson DM
AD  - 1 Minneapolis VA Health Care System , Minneapolis, MN.
AD  - 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN.
FAU - Rodman, John L
AU  - Rodman JL
AD  - 1 Minneapolis VA Health Care System , Minneapolis, MN.
FAU - Thuras, Paul D
AU  - Thuras PD
AD  - 1 Minneapolis VA Health Care System , Minneapolis, MN.
AD  - 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN.
FAU - Shiroma, Paulo R
AU  - Shiroma PR
AD  - 1 Minneapolis VA Health Care System , Minneapolis, MN.
AD  - 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN.
FAU - Lim, Kelvin O
AU  - Lim KO
AD  - 1 Minneapolis VA Health Care System , Minneapolis, MN.
AD  - 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170607
PL  - United States
TA  - J Altern Complement Med
JT  - Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.)
JID - 9508124
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - *Attitude of Health Personnel
MH  - Burnout, Professional/*psychology
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Depression/*psychology
MH  - Empathy
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Personnel/*psychology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Linear Models
MH  - Male
MH  - Mental Health Services/manpower
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Self Concept
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - burnout
OT  - healthcare
OT  - resilience
OT  - self-compassion
OT  - stress
EDAT- 2017/06/08 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/08 06:00
AID - 10.1089/acm.2017.0087 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Altern Complement Med. 2017 Jul;23(7):551-557. doi: 10.1089/acm.2017.0087. Epub
      2017 Jun 7.