PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Impact of High Altitude on Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis after R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer: A Population-Based Multicenter Study.

Abstract Geographic variation has an important role in both carcinogenesis and prognosis of gastric cancer (GC). High altitude is a special hypoxic environment that is also correlated with the occurrence of GC. Different onset features and prognoses of GC in high altitude with respect to plains are rarely reported and remain unknown. This multicenter study compared different clinicopathological characteristics and prognoses of patients with resected GC who were from locations of both high altitudes and plains in China. From December 2009 to December 2011, patients with resected GC were retrospectively recruited at four centers located at high altitudes and the plains. Clinicopathological data were analyzed to explore the differences between the two groups. The Cox proportional-hazards model was used to investigate the prognostic factors for GC and estimate the independent impact of altitude on long-term survival after adjusting for covariates. Noncardia GC, from a moderate to well tumor grade, was more common in patients from high altitudes. Moreover, a higher proportion of moderate to well and moderate tumor grade and younger age of onset was found in patients with noncardia GC coming from high altitudes. Different overall survival (OS) presented in noncardia GC rather than cardia GC, with 69.94% GC-related 3-yr OS in high altitude versus 75.23% in the plains. High altitude was confirmed as a significant prognostic factor for noncardia GC (the hazard ratio for high altitude vs. plains was 1:50, with a 95% confidence interval; 1.06-1.82, p = 0.018) through a multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model analysis. This prognostic value was independent of all other factors. High altitude has an important role in clinicopathological features and prognosis of GC. Improvements in GC diagnosis and management at high altitudes are urgently needed.
PMID
Related Publications

Characteristics and prognosis of gastric cancer in patients aged ≥ 70 years.

Expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase is an independent prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

Effect of complication grade on survival following curative gastrectomy for carcinoma.

Association of HER2 status with prognosis in gastric cancer patients undergoing R0 resection: A large-scale multicenter study in China.

Cardia and Non-Cardia Gastric Cancer Have Similar Stage-for-Stage Prognoses After R0 Resection: a Large-Scale, Multicenter Study in China.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Altitude

Keywords
Journal Title journal of environmental pathology, toxicology and oncology : official organ of the international society for environmental toxicology and cancer
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28605327
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170612
DCOM- 20170615
LR  - 20170615
IS  - 2162-6537 (Electronic)
IS  - 0731-8898 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017
TI  - Impact of High Altitude on Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis after R0
      Resection for Gastric Cancer: A Population-Based Multicenter Study.
PG  - 1-14
LID - 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.2016016904 [doi]
AB  - Geographic variation has an important role in both carcinogenesis and prognosis
      of gastric cancer (GC). High altitude is a special hypoxic environment that is
      also correlated with the occurrence of GC. Different onset features and prognoses
      of GC in high altitude with respect to plains are rarely reported and remain
      unknown. This multicenter study compared different clinicopathological
      characteristics and prognoses of patients with resected GC who were from
      locations of both high altitudes and plains in China. From December 2009 to
      December 2011, patients with resected GC were retrospectively recruited at four
      centers located at high altitudes and the plains. Clinicopathological data were
      analyzed to explore the differences between the two groups. The Cox
      proportional-hazards model was used to investigate the prognostic factors for GC 
      and estimate the independent impact of altitude on long-term survival after
      adjusting for covariates. Noncardia GC, from a moderate to well tumor grade, was 
      more common in patients from high altitudes. Moreover, a higher proportion of
      moderate to well and moderate tumor grade and younger age of onset was found in
      patients with noncardia GC coming from high altitudes. Different overall survival
      (OS) presented in noncardia GC rather than cardia GC, with 69.94% GC-related 3-yr
      OS in high altitude versus 75.23% in the plains. High altitude was confirmed as a
      significant prognostic factor for noncardia GC (the hazard ratio for high
      altitude vs. plains was 1:50, with a 95% confidence interval; 1.06-1.82, p =
      0.018) through a multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model analysis. This
      prognostic value was independent of all other factors. High altitude has an
      important role in clinicopathological features and prognosis of GC. Improvements 
      in GC diagnosis and management at high altitudes are urgently needed.
FAU - Zhao, Jiuda
AU  - Zhao J
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China; Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research 
      Center, Xining, China.
FAU - Du, Feng
AU  - Du F
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China.
FAU - Zhang, Yu
AU  - Zhang Y
AD  - Qinghai Red Cross Hospital, Xining, China.
FAU - Zhu, Haihong
AU  - Zhu H
AD  - People's Hospital of Qinghai province, Xining, China.
FAU - Dong, Li
AU  - Dong L
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China.
FAU - Shen, Guoshuang
AU  - Shen G
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Zheng, Fangchao
AU  - Zheng F
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Chen, Hui
AU  - Chen H
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Zhao, Junhui
AU  - Zhao J
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Ji, Faxiang
AU  - Ji F
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Luo, Yang
AU  - Luo Y
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China.
FAU - Ma, Fei
AU  - Ma F
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China.
FAU - Wang, Ziyi
AU  - Wang Z
AD  - Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University, High Altitude Medical Research Center,
      Xining, China.
FAU - Xu, Binghe
AU  - Xu B
AD  - Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese
      Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100021,
      China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Multicenter Study
PL  - United States
TA  - J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol
JT  - Journal of environmental pathology, toxicology and oncology : official organ of
      the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer
JID - 8501420
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - *Altitude
MH  - China
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Multivariate Analysis
MH  - Prognosis
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Stomach Neoplasms/etiology/*surgery
EDAT- 2017/06/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/13 06:00
AID - 5d555bca310a3a3c,49895bda722bde3e [pii]
AID - 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.2016016904 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2017;36(1):1-14. doi:
      10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.2016016904.