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Screening for Syphilis and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections in Pregnant Women - Guam, 2014.

Abstract Prenatal screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can prevent adverse perinatal outcomes. In Guam, the largest of the three U.S. territories in the Pacific, primary and secondary syphilis rates among women increased 473%, from 1.1 to 6.3 per 100,000 during 2009-2013 (1). In 2013, the first congenital syphilis case after no cases since 2008 was reported (1,2). Little is known about STI screening coverage and factors associated with inadequate screening among pregnant women in Guam. This study evaluated the prevalence of screening for syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), chlamydia, and gonorrhea, and examined correlates of inadequate screening among pregnant women in Guam. Data came from the medical records of a randomly selected sample of mothers with live births in 2014 at a large public hospital. Bivariate analyses and multivariable models using Poisson regression were conducted to determine factors associated with inadequate screening for syphilis and other STIs. Although most (93.5%) women received syphilis screening during pregnancy, 26.8% were not screened sufficiently early to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. Many women were not screened for HIV infection (31.1%), chlamydia (25.3%), or gonorrhea (25.7%). Prenatal care and insurance were important factors affecting STI screening during pregnancy. Prenatal care providers play an important role in preventing congenital infections. Policies and programs increasing STI and HIV services for pregnant women and improved access to and use of prenatal care are essential for promoting healthy mothers and infants.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28640799
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170622
DCOM- 20170623
LR  - 20170623
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 24
DP  - 2017 Jun 23
TI  - Screening for Syphilis and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections in Pregnant
      Women - Guam, 2014.
PG  - 644-648
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6624a4 [doi]
AB  - Prenatal screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can
      prevent adverse perinatal outcomes. In Guam, the largest of the three U.S.
      territories in the Pacific, primary and secondary syphilis rates among women
      increased 473%, from 1.1 to 6.3 per 100,000 during 2009-2013 (1). In 2013, the
      first congenital syphilis case after no cases since 2008 was reported (1,2).
      Little is known about STI screening coverage and factors associated with
      inadequate screening among pregnant women in Guam. This study evaluated the
      prevalence of screening for syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),
      chlamydia, and gonorrhea, and examined correlates of inadequate screening among
      pregnant women in Guam. Data came from the medical records of a randomly selected
      sample of mothers with live births in 2014 at a large public hospital. Bivariate 
      analyses and multivariable models using Poisson regression were conducted to
      determine factors associated with inadequate screening for syphilis and other
      STIs. Although most (93.5%) women received syphilis screening during pregnancy,
      26.8% were not screened sufficiently early to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes.
      Many women were not screened for HIV infection (31.1%), chlamydia (25.3%), or
      gonorrhea (25.7%). Prenatal care and insurance were important factors affecting
      STI screening during pregnancy. Prenatal care providers play an important role in
      preventing congenital infections. Policies and programs increasing STI and HIV
      services for pregnant women and improved access to and use of prenatal care are
      essential for promoting healthy mothers and infants.
FAU - Cha, Susan
AU  - Cha S
FAU - Malik, Tasneem
AU  - Malik T
FAU - Abara, Winston E
AU  - Abara WE
FAU - DeSimone, Mia S
AU  - DeSimone MS
FAU - Schumann, Bernadette
AU  - Schumann B
FAU - Mallada, Esther
AU  - Mallada E
FAU - Klemme, Michael
AU  - Klemme M
FAU - Aguon, Vince
AU  - Aguon V
FAU - Santos, Anne Marie
AU  - Santos AM
FAU - Peterman, Thomas A
AU  - Peterman TA
FAU - Bolan, Gail
AU  - Bolan G
FAU - Kamb, Mary L
AU  - Kamb ML
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170623
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Chlamydia Infections/prevention & control
MH  - Female
MH  - Gonorrhea/prevention & control
MH  - Guam
MH  - HIV Infections/prevention & control
MH  - Humans
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/*prevention & control
MH  - Prenatal Care/standards
MH  - Prenatal Diagnosis/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Sexually Transmitted Diseases/*prevention & control
MH  - Syphilis/*prevention & control
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/06/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/24 06:01
CRDT- 2017/06/23 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6624a4 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jun 23;66(24):644-648. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6624a4.