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PMID- 28655017
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170627
LR  - 20170627
IS  - 1538-3598 (Electronic)
IS  - 0098-7484 (Linking)
VI  - 317
IP  - 24
DP  - 2017 Jun 27
TI  - Prevalence and Ethnic Pattern of Diabetes and Prediabetes in China in 2013.
PG  - 2515-2523
LID - 10.1001/jama.2017.7596 [doi]
AB  - Importance: Previous studies have shown increasing prevalence of diabetes in
      China, which now has the world's largest diabetes epidemic. Objectives: To
      estimate the recent prevalence and to investigate the ethnic variation of
      diabetes and prediabetes in the Chinese adult population. Design, Setting, and
      Participants: A nationally representative cross-sectional survey in 2013 in
      mainland China, which consisted of 170287 participants. Exposures: Fasting plasma
      glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels were measured for all participants. A 2-hour
      oral glucose tolerance test was conducted for all participants without diagnosed 
      diabetes. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes were total diabetes and
      prediabetes defined according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria.
      Awareness and treatment were also evaluated. Hemoglobin A1c concentration of less
      than 7.0% among treated diabetes patients was considered adequate glycemic
      control. Minority ethnic groups in China with at least 1000 participants
      (Tibetan, Zhuang, Manchu, Uyghur, and Muslim) were compared with Han
      participants. Results: Among the Chinese adult population, the estimated
      standardized prevalence of total diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was 10.9%
      (95% CI, 10.4%-11.5%); that of diagnosed diabetes, 4.0% (95% CI, 3.6%-4.3%); and 
      that of prediabetes, 35.7% (95% CI, 34.1%-37.4%). Among persons with diabetes,
      36.5% (95% CI, 34.3%-38.6%) were aware of their diagnosis and 32.2% (95% CI,
      30.1%-34.2%) were treated; 49.2% (95% CI, 46.9%-51.5%) of patients treated had
      adequate glycemic control. Tibetan and Muslim Chinese had significantly lower
      crude prevalence of diabetes than Han participants (14.7% [95% CI, 14.6%-14.9%]
      for Han, 4.3% [95% CI, 3.5%-5.0%] for Tibetan, and 10.6% [95% CI, 9.3%-11.9%] for
      Muslim; P < .001 for Tibetan and Muslim compared with Han). In the multivariable 
      logistic models, the adjusted odds ratios compared with Han participants were
      0.42 (95% CI, 0.35-0.50) for diabetes and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71-0.84) for
      prediabetes for Tibetan Chinese and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.63-0.85) for diabetes and
      0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.86) for prediabetes in Muslim Chinese. Conclusions and
      Relevance: Among adults in China, the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes
      was 10.9%, and that for prediabetes was 35.7%. Differences from previous
      estimates for 2010 may be due to an alternate method of measuring hemoglobin A1c.
FAU - Wang, Limin
AU  - Wang L
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Gao, Pei
AU  - Gao P
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Zhang, Mei
AU  - Zhang M
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Huang, Zhengjing
AU  - Huang Z
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Zhang, Dudan
AU  - Zhang D
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Deng, Qian
AU  - Deng Q
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Li, Yichong
AU  - Li Y
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Zhao, Zhenping
AU  - Zhao Z
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Qin, Xueying
AU  - Qin X
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Jin, Danyao
AU  - Jin D
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Zhou, Maigeng
AU  - Zhou M
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
FAU - Tang, Xun
AU  - Tang X
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Hu, Yonghua
AU  - Hu Y
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking
      University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Wang, Linhong
AU  - Wang L
AD  - National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, 
      Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - JAMA
JT  - JAMA
JID - 7501160
EDAT- 2017/06/28 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/28 06:00
AID - 2633917 [pii]
AID - 10.1001/jama.2017.7596 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - JAMA. 2017 Jun 27;317(24):2515-2523. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7596.

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