PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Psychosocial Risk Factors for Low Back Pain and Absenteeism among Slovenian Professional Drivers.

Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the most common psychosocial risk factors for absenteeism and the extent to which low back pain occurs among Slovenian professional drivers as result of various psychosocial risk factors.
PMID
Related Publications

Psychosocial job factors associated with back and neck pain in public transit operators.

Knee and low back complaints in professional hospital nurses: occurrence, chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism.

Low back pain among professional bus drivers: ergonomic and occupational-psychosocial risk factors.

High physical work load and low job satisfaction increase the risk of sickness absence due to low back pain: results of a prospective cohort study.

Lower back pain and absenteeism among professional public transport drivers.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

absenteeism

low back pain

professional drivers

psychosocial factors

regression analysis

Journal Title central european journal of public health
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28662324
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
DA  - 20170629
LR  - 20170629
IS  - 1210-7778 (Print)
IS  - 1210-7778 (Linking)
VI  - 25
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jun
TI  - Psychosocial Risk Factors for Low Back Pain and Absenteeism among Slovenian
      Professional Drivers.
PG  - 135-140
LID - 10.21101/cejph.a4385 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the most common psychosocial
      risk factors for absenteeism and the extent to which low back pain occurs among
      Slovenian professional drivers as result of various psychosocial risk factors.
      METHOD: The study involved 275 professional drivers, mostly men (mean age 41.6
      years). Statistical data analysis was conducted using SPSS package version 21, MS
      Excel version 2007 and Pajek, version 3. The main method for data processing was 
      regression analysis. RESULTS: The results of the quantitative survey showed that 
      lower back pain is mostly caused by lifting and carrying heavy loads, inadequate 
      working conditions, poor physical fitness, regular nights out, shift work, and
      stress. Dissatisfaction with work, shift work and unsuitable working conditions
      significantly affect the incidence of low back pain. Absenteeism is influenced by
      factors such as dissatisfaction at work, disrespectful attitude of managers,
      unsuitable working conditions, personal dissatisfaction, lack of understanding of
      the partner, and enjoying nightlife on a regular basis. CONCLUSIONS: The study
      clarifies the unexplained holistic psychosocial risk factors and treatment
      effects on health in the population of professional drivers. Such factors can
      lead to absenteeism. The study also provides initial demonstration research in
      the Slovenian practice. Furthermore, it provides solutions in a holistic approach
      to solve the problem of risk factors management.
FAU - Kresal, Friderika
AU  - Kresal F
AD  - Fizioterapevtika, Institution of higher education, Medvode, Slovenia.
FAU - Suklan, Jana
AU  - Suklan J
AD  - School of Advanced Social Studies in Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica, Slovenia.
FAU - Roblek, Vasja
AU  - Roblek V
AD  - Faculty of management, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.
FAU - Jerman, Andrej
AU  - Jerman A
AD  - Ljubljanski potniski promet, d.d., Ljubljana, Slovenia.
FAU - Mesko, Maja
AU  - Mesko M
AD  - Faculty of management, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - Czech Republic
TA  - Cent Eur J Public Health
JT  - Central European journal of public health
JID - 9417324
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - absenteeism
OT  - low back pain
OT  - professional drivers
OT  - psychosocial factors
OT  - regression analysis
EDAT- 2017/07/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/30 06:00
PHST- 2015/04/09 [received]
PHST- 2016/09/12 [accepted]
AID - cejph.a4385 [pii]
AID - 10.21101/cejph.a4385 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):135-140. doi: 10.21101/cejph.a4385.