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Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field.

Abstract <b>Introduction and objective.</b> The Karachaganak oil and gas condensate field (KOGCF), one of the largest in the world, located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (RoK) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of 9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide (H<sub>2</sub>S) emissions, and the occurrence of low-level concentrations of hydrogen sulfide around certain industrial installations (esp. oil refineries) is a well known fact. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact on human health and the economic damage to the country due to H<sub>2</sub>S emissions. <b>Materials and method.</b> Dose-response dependency between H<sub>2</sub>S concentrations in the air and cardiovascular morbidity using multiple regression analysis was applied. Economic damage from morbidity was derived with a newly-developed method, with Kazakhstani peculiarities taken into account. <b>Results.</b>Hydrogen sulfide air pollution due to the KOGCF activity costs the state almost $60,000 per year. Moreover, this is the reason for a more than 40% rise incardiovascular morbidity in the region. <b>Conclusion.</b> The reduction of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation results in associated air pollution.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Kazakhstan

air pollution

economic damage

human health

hydrogen sulfide

oil field

Journal Title annals of agricultural and environmental medicine : aaem
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28664696
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170630
DCOM- 20170710
LR  - 20170713
IS  - 1898-2263 (Electronic)
IS  - 1232-1966 (Linking)
VI  - 24
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jun 08
TI  - Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field.
PG  - 213-216
LID - 74562 [pii]
AB  - &lt;b&gt;Introduction and objective.&lt;/b&gt; The Karachaganak oil and gas condensate field 
      (KOGCF), one of the largest in the world, located in the Republic of Kazakhstan
      (RoK) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of
      9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific
      odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide (H&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;S)
      emissions, and the occurrence of low-level concentrations of hydrogen sulfide
      around certain industrial installations (esp. oil refineries) is a well known
      fact. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact on human health and
      the economic damage to the country due to H&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;S emissions. &lt;b&gt;Materials 
      and method.&lt;/b&gt; Dose-response dependency between H&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;S concentrations in
      the air and cardiovascular morbidity using multiple regression analysis was
      applied. Economic damage from morbidity was derived with a newly-developed
      method, with Kazakhstani peculiarities taken into account.
      &lt;b&gt;Results.&lt;/b&gt;Hydrogen sulfide air pollution due to the KOGCF activity costs the
      state almost $60,000 per year. Moreover, this is the reason for a more than 40%
      rise incardiovascular morbidity in the region. &lt;b&gt;Conclusion.&lt;/b&gt; The reduction
      of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive 
      constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be
      made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation
      results in associated air pollution.
FAU - Kenessary, Dinara
AU  - Kenessary D
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
      [email protected]
FAU - Kenessary, Almas
AU  - Kenessary A
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
FAU - Kenessariyev, Ussen Ismailovich
AU  - Kenessariyev UI
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
FAU - Juszkiewicz, Konrad
AU  - Juszkiewicz K
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
FAU - Amrin, Meiram Kazievich
AU  - Amrin MK
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
FAU - Erzhanova, Aya Eralovna
AU  - Erzhanova AE
AD  - Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170608
PL  - Poland
TA  - Ann Agric Environ Med
JT  - Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine : AAEM
JID - 9500166
RN  - 0 (Air Pollutants)
RN  - YY9FVM7NSN (Hydrogen Sulfide)
SB  - IM
MH  - Air Pollutants/analysis/*economics/toxicity
MH  - Air Pollution/analysis/*economics
MH  - Cardiovascular Diseases/*economics/epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Health Care Costs
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hydrogen Sulfide/analysis/*economics/toxicity
MH  - Kazakhstan/epidemiology
MH  - Oil and Gas Fields/*chemistry
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Kazakhstan
OT  - air pollution
OT  - economic damage
OT  - human health
OT  - hydrogen sulfide
OT  - oil field
EDAT- 2017/07/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/01 06:00
AID - 74562 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Ann Agric Environ Med. 2017 Jun 8;24(2):213-216. Epub 2017 Jun 8.