PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Human infections caused by free-living amoebae.

Abstract [b]Abstract Introduction[/b]. Among free-living amoebae that are widely distributed in nature only four genera/species are known as agents of human infections:[i] Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleriafowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris[/i] and[i] Sappiniapedata[/i]. These amoebae are not well adapted to parasitism, and could exist in the human environment without the need for a host. Infections due to these amoebae, despite low morbidity, are characterized by relatively high mortality rate and pose serious clinical problems. [b]Objectve[/b]. This review study presents and summarizes current knowledge about infections due to pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amoebae focused on epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment based on global literature. [b]State of knowledge[/b]. All four genera have been recognized as etiologic factors of fatal central nervous system infections and other serious diseases in humans. [i]N. fowleri[/i] causes an acute fulminating meningoencephalitis in children and young adults. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. and [i]B.mandrillaris[/i] are opportunistic pathogens causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and disseminated or localized infections which could affect the skin, sinuses, lungs, adrenals and/or bones. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. is also the main agent of acute eye infection -[i] Acanthamoeba keratitis, [/i]mostly in contact lens wearers. However, there is only one recognized case of encephalitis caused by [i]S. pedata. [/i] [b]Conclusions[/b]. Amoebic diseases are difficult to diagnose which leads to delayed treatment, and result in a high mortality rate. Considering those issues, there is an urgent need to draw more attention to this type of diseases.
PMID
Related Publications

Free-living amoebae as opportunistic and non-opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.

Infections with free-living amebae.

Pathogenesis of amoebic encephalitis: Are the amoebae being credited to an 'inside job' done by the host immune response?

Pathogenic free-living amoebae: epidemiology and clinical review.

Pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amoebae: Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, Naegleria fowleri, and Sappinia diploidea.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Acanthamoeba

Amebiasis

Balamuthia mandrillaris

Naegleriafowleri

Protozoal Infections

Journal Title annals of agricultural and environmental medicine : aaem
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28664704
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170630
DCOM- 20170710
LR  - 20170713
IS  - 1898-2263 (Electronic)
IS  - 1232-1966 (Linking)
VI  - 24
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 May 11
TI  - Human infections caused by free-living amoebae.
PG  - 254-260
LID - 72498 [pii]
LID - 10.5604/12321966.1233568 [doi]
AB  - [b]Abstract Introduction[/b]. Among free-living amoebae that are widely
      distributed in nature only four genera/species are known as agents of human
      infections:[i] Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleriafowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris[/i]
      and[i] Sappiniapedata[/i]. These amoebae are not well adapted to parasitism, and 
      could exist in the human environment without the need for a host. Infections due 
      to these amoebae, despite low morbidity, are characterized by relatively high
      mortality rate and pose serious clinical problems. [b]Objectve[/b]. This review
      study presents and summarizes current knowledge about infections due to
      pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amoebae focused on epidemiology,
      clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment based on global literature.
      [b]State of knowledge[/b]. All four genera have been recognized as etiologic
      factors of fatal central nervous system infections and other serious diseases in 
      humans. [i]N. fowleri[/i] causes an acute fulminating meningoencephalitis in
      children and young adults. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. and [i]B.mandrillaris[/i] are
      opportunistic pathogens causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and
      disseminated or localized infections which could affect the skin, sinuses, lungs,
      adrenals and/or bones. [i]Acanthamoeba spp[/i]. is also the main agent of acute
      eye infection -[i] Acanthamoeba keratitis, [/i]mostly in contact lens wearers.
      However, there is only one recognized case of encephalitis caused by [i]S.
      pedata. [/i] [b]Conclusions[/b]. Amoebic diseases are difficult to diagnose which
      leads to delayed treatment, and result in a high mortality rate. Considering
      those issues, there is an urgent need to draw more attention to this type of
      diseases.
FAU - Krol-Turminska, Katarzyna
AU  - Krol-Turminska K
AD  - Chair and Department of Medical Microbiology Medical University of Lublin.
FAU - Olender, Alina
AU  - Olender A
AD  - Chair and Department of Medical Microbiology Medical University of Lublin.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - Poland
TA  - Ann Agric Environ Med
JT  - Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine : AAEM
JID - 9500166
SB  - IM
MH  - Amebiasis/diagnosis/epidemiology/*parasitology/therapy
MH  - Amoeba/genetics/isolation & purification/*physiology
MH  - Animals
MH  - Humans
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Acanthamoeba
OT  - Amebiasis
OT  - Balamuthia mandrillaris
OT  - Naegleriafowleri
OT  - Protozoal Infections
EDAT- 2017/07/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/01 06:00
AID - 72498 [pii]
AID - 10.5604/12321966.1233568 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Ann Agric Environ Med. 2017 May 11;24(2):254-260. doi: 10.5604/12321966.1233568.