PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Babesiosis Surveillance - Wisconsin, 2001-2015.

Abstract Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Babesia microti, an intraerythocytic protozoan. Babesia microti, like the causal agents for Lyme disease and anaplasmosis, is endemic to the northeastern and upper midwestern United States where it is usually transmitted by the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Although babesiosis is usually a mild to moderate illness, older or immunocompromised persons can develop a serious malaria-like illness that can be fatal without prompt treatment. The most common initial clinical signs and symptoms of babesiosis (fever, fatigue, chills, and diaphoresis) are nonspecific and present diagnostic challenges that can contribute to delays in diagnosis and effective treatment with atovaquone and azithromycin (1). Results of one study revealed a mean delay of 12-14 days from symptom onset to treatment (2). Knowledge of the incidence and geographic distribution of babesiosis can raise the index of clinical suspicion and facilitate more prompt diagnosis and lifesaving treatment (1). The first known case of babesiosis in Wisconsin was detected in 1985 (3), and babesiosis became officially reportable in the state in 2001. Wisconsin babesiosis surveillance data for 2001-2015 were analyzed in 3-year intervals to compare demographic, epidemiologic, and laboratory features among patients with cases of reported babesiosis. To determine possible reasons for an increase in reported Babesia infection, trends in electronic laboratory reporting and diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction testing (PCR) were examined. Between the first and last 3-year analysis intervals, there was a 26-fold increase in the incidence of confirmed babesiosis, in addition to geographic expansion. These trends might be generalizable to other states with endemic disease, similar suburbanization and forest fragmentation patterns, and warming average temperatures (4). Accurate surveillance in states where babesiosis is endemic is necessary to estimate the increasing burden of babesiosis and other tickborne diseases and to develop appropriate public health interventions for prevention and practice.
PMID
Related Publications

Relatively low prevalence of Babesia microti and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in the Lehigh Valley region of eastern Pennsylvania.

A fatal case of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis in the State of Delaware.

Epidemiologic features of human babesiosis in Wisconsin, 1996-2005.

Babesiosis surveillance - 18 States, 2011.

Quantitative PCR for detection of Babesia microti in Ixodes scapularis ticks and in human blood.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Population Surveillance

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28683059
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170706
DCOM- 20170710
LR  - 20170713
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 26
DP  - 2017 Jul 07
TI  - Babesiosis Surveillance - Wisconsin, 2001-2015.
PG  - 687-691
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6626a2 [doi]
AB  - Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Babesia microti,
      an intraerythocytic protozoan. Babesia microti, like the causal agents for Lyme
      disease and anaplasmosis, is endemic to the northeastern and upper midwestern
      United States where it is usually transmitted by the blacklegged tick, Ixodes
      scapularis. Although babesiosis is usually a mild to moderate illness, older or
      immunocompromised persons can develop a serious malaria-like illness that can be 
      fatal without prompt treatment. The most common initial clinical signs and
      symptoms of babesiosis (fever, fatigue, chills, and diaphoresis) are nonspecific 
      and present diagnostic challenges that can contribute to delays in diagnosis and 
      effective treatment with atovaquone and azithromycin (1). Results of one study
      revealed a mean delay of 12-14 days from symptom onset to treatment (2).
      Knowledge of the incidence and geographic distribution of babesiosis can raise
      the index of clinical suspicion and facilitate more prompt diagnosis and
      lifesaving treatment (1). The first known case of babesiosis in Wisconsin was
      detected in 1985 (3), and babesiosis became officially reportable in the state in
      2001. Wisconsin babesiosis surveillance data for 2001-2015 were analyzed in
      3-year intervals to compare demographic, epidemiologic, and laboratory features
      among patients with cases of reported babesiosis. To determine possible reasons
      for an increase in reported Babesia infection, trends in electronic laboratory
      reporting and diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction testing (PCR) were examined.
      Between the first and last 3-year analysis intervals, there was a 26-fold
      increase in the incidence of confirmed babesiosis, in addition to geographic
      expansion. These trends might be generalizable to other states with endemic
      disease, similar suburbanization and forest fragmentation patterns, and warming
      average temperatures (4). Accurate surveillance in states where babesiosis is
      endemic is necessary to estimate the increasing burden of babesiosis and other
      tickborne diseases and to develop appropriate public health interventions for
      prevention and practice.
FAU - Stein, Elizabeth
AU  - Stein E
FAU - Elbadawi, Lina I
AU  - Elbadawi LI
FAU - Kazmierczak, James
AU  - Kazmierczak J
FAU - Davis, Jeffrey P
AU  - Davis JP
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170707
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Babesia microti/isolation & purification
MH  - Babesiosis/*diagnosis/*epidemiology
MH  - Child
MH  - Clinical Laboratory Information Systems/trends
MH  - Electronic Health Records/trends
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Polymerase Chain Reaction
MH  - *Population Surveillance
MH  - Wisconsin/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/07 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/07 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6626a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jul 7;66(26):687-691. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6626a2.